NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 46 Issue 1, Jan 1969
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20988
Abstract:
This biographical essay looks at the life and turbulent career of colonial figure Captain James Wimble, who lived in Sussex, the West Indies, Boston, and North Carolina. Wimble worked as a mariner, trader, distiller, landowner, colonizer, map maker, and privateer. His careers and experiences were heavily marked by the public relationships between England and America, the American mainland and the West Indies, older New England and young North Carolina, and especially between England and Spain.
Record #:
20989
Abstract:
This article looks at the career of historian Charles Austin Beard with an emphasis on references to North Carolina and the Quaker Ideal in his work. Links to both of these subjects found in his biographical details are also discussed.
Record #:
20995
Abstract:
This is a reprint of entries from the diary of Lt. James W. Chapin, Adjutant of the Eighth Indiana Cavalry Regiment. Chapin wrote it while riding with Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry on the left wing of Gen. William T. Sherman's army during the Carolinas Campaign. The entries provide an account of Chapin's experiences during Sherman's march through the Carolinas as well as details and key witness testimony about allegations concerning the shooting of Union prisoners by Confederate Gen. Joseph Wheeler's men.
Source:
Record #:
20994
Abstract:
This is a reprint of three poems written in colonial North Carolina whose subject matter represents what was to become the American and Southern mind. The first, published June 11, 1737 in the \"South Carolina Gazette\" presents feelings on the rights of freeborn Englishmen via analogy. The second poem, a Moravian hymn reprinted in both original German and its English translation, espouses the warmth of religious feeling and praise of God. The final poem, an Anglican hymn written to the 100 Psalm tune, was penned in 1759 by Royal Governor Arthur Dobbs and expressed a mixture of patriotism and piety that would often appear later in American verse and prose.
Source: