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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 32 Issue 4, Oct 1955
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20676
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This article looks at advertisements printed in North Carolina newspapers between 1751 and 1778 for information about the communities in which the papers were printed, as the editorial portions of the papers carried little comment on the local scene. With an abundance of advertisements being concerned with matters relating to property and trade, the author gives specific attention to advertisements relating to slaves and servants, real and personal property advertisements, and trade, commerce and industry reflected in advertising.
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20678
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In the last two decades of the 19th century, a considerable amount of British capitol was invested in companies organized to work in the Southern United States. However with few exceptions, the companies returned little or no profit to investors. This article examines some of these ventures, a majority of which had to do with mining, and the circumstances of their creation and ultimate failure.
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Record #:
20680
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This is the conclusion of a two-part article detailing the military experiences of Union soldier and Bethlehem, PA native James A. Peifer drawn primarily from the author's analysis of a collection of letters written by Peifer to his sister Mary. Excerpts from the letters are included.
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20677
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This article is the second in a series examining the life and career of North Carolina Senator Bedford Brown. This installment covers the period between 1840 and the fall of Jacksonian democracy to Brown's death in 1897. Particular attention is given to his unwavering belief in Republicanism, States Rights, and his loyalty to Unionism.
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Record #:
20679
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This article looks at the close relationship between Joseph Ruggles Wilson and his son Thomas Woodrow Wilson who became President of the United States.
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