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6 results for Carolina Gardener Vol. 26 Issue 3, Apr 2014
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Record #:
21847
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The finding of a statue of this saint in Wing Haven Gardens in Charlotte piqued Loewer's interest, especially the inscription beneath it--the Patron Saint of Gardeners. Loewer recounts what his research uncovered about this Irish monk who lived during the 600s.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Apr 2014, p22, 24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21846
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The emblem of the South is the dogwood. McElvain describes three that grow in the Carolinas and across the Southeast--flowering dogwood (C. florida), Japanese dogwood (C. kousa), and cornelian cherry (C. mas).
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Subject(s):
Record #:
21849
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Healy encourages gardeners and others not to buy peppers in grocery stores but to plant their own either in backyard gardens or in containers on the porch. He lists several types to choose from, such as cupid, Biscayne, mellow star, and tequila sunrise and explains the steps to take when planting them from seed. Planting dates for North Carolina's three regions are included.
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Record #:
21850
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Most individuals know carrots only from the orange, perfectly shaped vegetable they see on the supermarket shelves. However, carrots come in a variety of shapes, colors, and sizes--orange, yellow, purple, white, long and short, twiggy and squat. Gruener describes how to plant them and lists the spring and fall planting dates in North Carolina.
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Record #:
21859
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Impatiens is a popular North Carolina shade plant; however, two years ago they were attacked over a wide area of states pathogen called downy mildew, which causes defoliation and then total plant collapse. There are no fungicides that will control the problem. Many garden centers are posting signs warning gardeners about downy mildew. Neill offers suggestions of what can be done once the disease appears.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
21860
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Abstract:
Barnes explains how people who live in condominiums or town houses can have a flower garden through the use of pots.
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