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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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99 results for "Washington the Magazine"
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Record #:
26918
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There are many ways to enjoy the Pamlico River, whether it be fishing, boating, or just viewing the scenery from shore. However, there are also 5 different watersports options available to visitors and residents alike, including tubing, wakeboarding, kneeboarding, paddleboarding, and kayaking.
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Record #:
21940
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Artist Jayne Wall talks about her lifetime experiences and her artistic creations.
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Record #:
21987
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Rumley recounts the history of Washington's O. Henry Book Club, which, in December 2013, turned 100 years old.
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21988
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Rumley recounts the history of Gerrard Chapel Primitive Baptist Church in Blount's Creek. The church was established in 1808, but closed its doors in the 1970s after members moved on to larger, newer churches.
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Record #:
21948
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Colonel Joshua T. Tayloe built his home, Elmwood, in Washington in 1820. It is located at 721 W. Main Street. Frannye Fowle purchased the home in 2007; she discusses with Rumley how she has furnished the home.
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Record #:
37320
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In the area of Washington formerly known as “Pungo Town,” the Federal Style residence built by two brothers has changed little since its construction in 1795. Passed down to members of the Marsh family until 1942, a relative of former owners restored the house to National Trust preservation guidelines as part of her master’s thesis. The Congletons continue the architectural integrity tradition for the residence whose housing history includes Union officers during the Civil War.
Record #:
21949
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Washington watercolorist Pat Holscher discusses her art. In 2009, the National Watercolor Society awarded her the medqal of honor for her painting \"Family Dynamics.\" It is the highest honor a watercolorist can receive in the United States.
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Record #:
19556
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While hiking the Appalachian Trail, Washington resident Steve Ainsworth was the victim of an unusually heavily snow storm that impeded his travel and stranded him in the mountains. Through the dedicated work of rescuers and Ainsworth's preparedness, he was rescued  and returned to his family.
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Record #:
37315
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A way of life considered Southern finds a prominent place still in Beaufort County. Included as one of the older aspects of a tradition passed down for generations was decoys, in this case used for duck hunting.
Record #:
23852
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The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Norfolk Southern Railway became important parts of Beaufort County's and specifically the town of Washington's economic system in the late nineteenth century.
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Record #:
19580
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This past March, the first Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition was held at the Washington Civic Center. Created as a collaboration between the Pamlico Writers Group and the Beaufort County Arts Council, the conference and competition received entries from local North Carolina writers and entrants from as far away as France.
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Record #:
19551
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The Tactical Response Team of Beaufort County take their jobs and the training required for it very seriously. Captain Russell Davenport, head of the team, drills and trains his teammates so they are prepared psychologically and physically for any situation that might arise. In addition to the regularly scheduled drills, the entire team also works out at a local gym together three days a week to keep themselves in peak physical shape.
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Record #:
19576
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In 1898, Washington, N.C. became one of the most technologically advanced fire departments in the state with its acquisition of a Silsby steam fire engine. This technological marvel was able to pumped between 500 and 600 gallons of water per minute and was used in its last fire in 1937. Today the Silsby sits on display in the front room of the current fire station, visible to those who travel by.
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Record #:
21986
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Cedar Grove, a plantation built in 1839, was John Small's summer home. Union troops burned the house and outbuildings during the Civil War. Later in 1904, plans were developed to build a neighborhood along the park's half-a-mile of river shoreline that became known as Washington Park. Wilder's article, illustrated with historic photographs, recounts the history of the community.
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Record #:
21952
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Rumley describes Idylwild, a 1907 house built in Washington on Market Street. In 1901, Washingtonian Blake Baker Nicholson married Sally Davis Owens, a widow from Oxford, Mississippi, and built their home six years later. The house is a mixture of styles--Green revival, plantation, and Tudor.
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