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14 results for Droughts
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Record #:
5266
Author(s):
Abstract:
The drought that began in North Carolina in 1998 is the most severe one the state has ever experienced. Many of the state's reservoirs, creeks, rivers, and aquifers are dropping. Lail discusses what the state and various communities are doing to cope with the problem and makes suggestions on how to save water.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Aug 2002, p1, 8-9, il
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Record #:
10499
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Abstract:
A severe drought in North Carolina has caused a drop in reservoirs that supply municipal water, reduced the amount of groundwater availability, and lowered the flow of rivers and streams. Warren discusses how cities like Raleigh and Durham are dealing with this situation.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, Jan 2008, p14, 16-18, il Periodical Website
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Full Text:
Record #:
28107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Orange County is considering worst case scenarios as the current drought has reservoirs at 40 percent capacity. All of the scenarios are expensive, but running out of water would be more costly. The three scenarios are detailed, along with current water restriction measures. The landscaping industry has been pushing back against recent measures aimed to limit the use of water for landscaping.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 5, January 2008, p15 Periodical Website
Record #:
30423
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new agricultural conservation technique is proving to be a life-saver for drought stricken North Carolina farmers. Vegetative cover has been approved for use in most counties and farmers can apply for federal cost-sharing to establish vegetative cover, which prevents erosion and provides emergency needs for grazing, hay and soil protection.
Record #:
34326
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council report for March 5, 2001 said that extreme drought conditions persist over the western region of North Carolina and that numerous water systems are still dealing with below normal water supplies. The council said that only limited improvements in water supply conditions may occur over the next several months and that water systems whose reservoirs do not refill by April are advised to plan for limited water supplies during the summer months.
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Record #:
34081
Author(s):
Abstract:
Record high temperatures and drought conditions have created emergency conditions for both the agricultural community and water utilities in North Carolina. After record amounts of water being used, water utilities are beginning to implement voluntary or mandatory water restrictions.
Record #:
34274
Author(s):
Abstract:
On October 29, the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council issued a warning that if below-average rainfall continues through the spring of 1999, the result could be a record drought. In the mountains, stream flows are approaching record low flows and public water supply systems have enacted water conservation measures. Below normal precipitation in North Carolina is being attributed to La Niña.
Record #:
34298
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the United States Geological Survey, drought conditions began to prevail across North Carolina beginning in summer 1998 and worsened until December 1998. Rains during December 1998 through May 1999 helped in many areas to alleviate the drought’s effects and return streamflows to normal. However, rainfall totals were still below normal and were insufficient to completely recharge the groundwater sources that sustain stream base flows.
Record #:
34335
Author(s):
Abstract:
At a meeting of the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council on November 8, representatives said that many of North Carolina’s major cities are experiencing “top ten” dry conditions with rainfall deficits exceeded only by the drought of 1986. Precipitation across the state has been from 10-25 inches below normal for the last twenty-four months.
Record #:
34341
Author(s):
Abstract:
On July 12, 2002, Governor Mike Easley issued a statement asking the federal government to designate fifty-four North Carolina counties as disaster areas due to severe drought throughout the state. On recommendation of the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council, the governor also called water systems and agricultural and industrial users in the Cape Fear River Basin, the Yadkin River Basin, and in Piedmont areas classified as in “exceptional” or “extreme” drought to reduce their water use by at least twenty-percent through mandatory restrictions. This article discusses the drought of 2002, the conditions of stream flows, groundwater and reservoirs, and the impacts to water quality, energy operations and the economy.
Record #:
34346
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council, above-normal precipitation since September associated with the El Niño warm event in the Pacific has significantly reversed drought conditions across North Carolina. The State Climate Office expects above normal precipitation through the spring, which should allow water supplies across the state to be in much better condition than last year.
Record #:
34360
Author(s):
Abstract:
Water providers and customers in North Carolina learned invaluable lessons from the record drought that reached its peak in the summer of 2002. Mandatory conservation measures were widespread and many people became good at rationing water. In spite of conservation efforts, municipal water providers in Orange County and other communities have increased their rates.
Record #:
34369
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 20, at the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council meeting, Governor Mike Easley stated he will bring thirty of the state’s worst hit water systems together on January 14, in Greensboro to review the status of these systems. The council will review plans for the drought and reserve sources of water.
Record #:
34368
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is experiencing a severe drought, and cities are questioning how bad its effects will be on public water supplies. This article discusses records of previous droughts in North Carolina and how conservation of water resources was addressed.
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