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3 results for Burying beetles
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Record #:
9039
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In the 1850s, wealthy women of Wilmington wore fire beetles on their clothes for formal evening occasions. Emitting a beautiful greenish light at the base and reddish light at the abdomen, fire beetles were sold at about twenty-five cents a dozen. The beetles required food, twice daily baths, and were kept in tiny cages. The bugs are native to tropical North and South America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p19
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Record #:
9970
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Many species of beetles share the state with people and animals. Ellis describes some of the more interesting ones. There are far more good beetles than bad; less than one percent of them are harmful to humans and crops.
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Record #:
4598
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Why are so few dead creatures - mice, shrews, moles, birds, chipmunks, and others - not seen in the woodlands? The answer is the burying beetle, or more formally, Nictophores tomentosus. When the sun goes down, these beetles go to work, locating and burying the dead. Creatures the size of a mouse can be buried in two to three hours. Pollution is eliminated, and raw materials return to the soil to nourish plant growth. Nineteen species of beetles work in North Carolina.
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