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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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72 results for "Education--Laws and legislation"
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Record #:
27589
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The state has partially funded the school voucher program in NC to allow students and parents to choose the schools that are best for them. School vouchers provide $4,200 for low-income students to use to attend private schools they could not afford without the voucher. Opponents argue that this unconstitutional and takes money from public schools. A judge has halted the voucher program and the legality of the program will be decided in the courts.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p18-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27597
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The injunction that halted the voucher program has been overturned by the NC Supreme Court. Now, the General Assembly is moving to add $8 to $10 million to the voucher program. The vouchers provide opportunities for low-income students to attend private or religious schools of their choice. Groups opposing using public funds for private education will appeal, but it is likely to be upheld as constitutional.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 26, June 2014, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
24911
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Heath Morrison struggles with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system. While he has many plans to fix the system and is described as excellent at listening to the problems others voice, there is some concern that he is just a listener and not an activist.
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Record #:
30445
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The North Carolina Bankers Association presented Governor Pat McCrory with a resolution supporting the North Carolina Common Core State Standards. The resolution called for continued implementation of these rigorous goals and aligned assessments to ensure students are prepared for success in college and career. This article discusses the standards in relation to statistics on test scores, graduation rates and employment.
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Record #:
19803
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Joyce discusses the 2008 North Carolina General Assembly's legislation as it applies to appropriations and salaries, student relationships and financial aid, and university and community college governance.
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Record #:
19802
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The authors present summaries of statutory changes affecting elementary and secondary public education in North Carolina.
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Record #:
10253
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Mesibov and Joyce discuss educational legislation of the 2007 North Carolina General Assembly, including appropriations; enrollment and attendance; student issues that include students with disabilities, suspensions, and reassignment appeals; and miscellaneous legislation, including school funding disputes.
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Record #:
10254
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Joyce discusses the 2007 North Carolina General Assembly's legislation as it applies to appropriations and salaries, student relationships and financial aid, and university and community college governance.
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Record #:
9429
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After several lean years of funding for the University of North Carolina and Community College systems, the 2006 General Assembly increased funding for the UNC System by 12 percent and the Community College System by 15 percent. Joyce discusses the assembly's actions as they apply to appropriations and salaries, student relationships and financial aid, and university and community college governance.
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Record #:
9430
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Mesibov and Joyce discuss educational legislation of the 2006 North Carolina General Assembly, including appropriations; student issues that include students with disabilities, pregnant and parenting students, and the schoolchildren's health act; and miscellaneous legislation, including More At Four and Office of School Readiness.
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Record #:
7537
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Two significant events concerning public school funding occurred in the summer of 2005. The North Carolina General Assembly approved a long-contested educational lottery, and the North Carolina Supreme Court handed down a landmark decision in NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL BOARDS ASSN V. MOORE. This ruling resulted in a $120 million budget allocation to the public schools from the state's Civil Penalty and Forfeiture Fund. Denning discusses these two events.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 108, Nov 2005, p1-10, f
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Record #:
7824
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Mesibov and Joyce summarize legislation passed by the 2005 North Carolina General Assembly affecting public education in the state. One of the most important pieces of legislation was the passage of the lottery act and the creation of the Education Lottery Fund. Other legislation included finance, instructional issues, expanding opportunities for students, cooperative efforts to help students, and health issues.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 36 Issue 3, Summer 2005, p1-13, il
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Record #:
7825
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Money for higher education remained tight in the 2005 North Carolina General Assembly. There was only a slight rise in funding for the University of North Carolina and Community College systems. Joyce discusses the assembly's actions as they apply to appropriations and salaries, purchasing and contracting, student relationships and financial aid, and university and community college governance.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 36 Issue 3, Summer 2005, p14-20, f
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Record #:
7980
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Denning analyzes the North Carolina Supreme Court's 2005 decision interpreting the fines and forfeitures provision of Article IX, Section 7 of the North Carolina Constitution. that states the proceeds of all penalties and forfeitures and of all fines collected shall be used exclusively for maintaining free public schools.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 36 Issue 4, Fall 2005, p1-9, f
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Record #:
6836
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During the 2002-03 school year, all North Carolina public schools were evaluated for the first time under the state's ABC's of Public Education of 1996 and the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. An interesting result was that almost half of the schools that met state standards failed to meet federal standards. Stallings discusses whether or not the state's assessment program meets the requirements of the new federal legislation; the first year assessment results and if the state's results met federal expectations; what sanctions will the state face because of the results; and will North Carolina be able to meet the new standards in the time the federal act allots.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p32-52, 54-57, il, f Periodical Website
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