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22 results for Rights, Douglas L
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Record #:
13367
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The former Curator of Archaeology of the National Museum in Washington, Neil M. Judd, had to solve many mysteries in his position. One was the puzzle of the Cicada Whistles, which came from Missouri, Virginia, and North Carolina. These surface finds were identical in size and made colored clay in two-piece molds. It is still a mystery if they were made by prehistoric Indians or contemporary commercial groups.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 12, Aug 1953, p6, f
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Record #:
13595
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Among its many other \"firsts,\" North Carolina can also claim the distinction of being the first state in the Union to observe the significance of Independence Day.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 4, June 1951, p3, 18, il
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Record #:
13653
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The first English colonists in America met the Indians of Pasquotank. The Indians were of Algonquin stock, a vast body of scattered tribes occupying territory extending from the sandbanks of Carolina to the St. Lawrence River and westward to the Rocky Mountains.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 25, Nov 1951, p11, 24
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Record #:
13663
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Before the first settlers arrived in colonial days to find a home in what is now Cabarrus County, Siouan Indians claimed the land.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 27, Dec 1951, p16-17
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Record #:
13849
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Reported to be living along the Yadkin River, near Salisbury, in the 1670s, the Saura Native Americans comprised the Indians of Dan Valley. Saura artifacts have been located within Rockingham County and consist of fragments of clay pottery, deer antlers, stone ax, spurs of wild fowl, bone tools, broken clay tobacco pipes, and stone arrow points.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 43, Mar 1953, p12, il
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Record #:
14176
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Brought from Europe in 1785, the State's oldest fire engine served the town of Salem for many years in the protection of its property. It is now in the Wachovia Museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 35, Jan 1950, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14268
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Quite a number of Indian mounds have been uncovered in various sections of North Carolina and have yielded much interesting information concerning life of the Indians.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 5, July 1947, p8, 19, f
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Record #:
14568
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Henry E. Fries from Winston-Salem was an influential businessman during the late 1800s. The article touches on his more noteworthy contributions including the first water generated power plant built in 1897 on Yadkin Shoals, fourteen miles from Winston-Salem. Also of interest, is Mr. Fries' interaction with Thomas Edison who, at that time, was interested in mining tungsten in the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 8, July 1946, p3, 20, il
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Record #:
14602
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The shell ornaments of the Indians who lived in North Carolina had developed a high sense of artistry in personal adornment of various kinds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 43, Mar 1946, p10, 36, f
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Record #:
14764
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Discoveries in North Carolina, in addition to those in New Mexico, indicate that the American Indian has been on this country longer than was generally supposed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 27, Dec 1944, p8, f
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Record #:
14849
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The eastern band of Cherokees have never lost the art of basketry which they practice with genuine skill on the Qualla Reservation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 49, May 1945, p7, f
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Record #:
14921
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Evidence for Native Americans varied greatly depending on the region. Along the coast, shell middens were found and or around village or lodge sites. Some of these sites were seasonal often used for fishing during summer months. In the mountains, cave and rock shelters were sought out for protection. Pottery was typically found in fragments or sherds, but occasionally an entire vessel was discovered. In the 1940s, the Archaeological Society of North Carolina was attempting to find and preserve any remaining Native American pottery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 30, Dec 1943, p5-6, il
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Record #:
14988
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Many towns and communities can boast that George Washington \"slept here.\" In Winston-Salem, the Salem Tavern, that still exists in North Carolina, once entertained the Father of Our Country, and for two nights at that.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 35, Jan 1943, p4-5, 22, f
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Record #:
19203
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Discoveries of ancient relics, including pottery, relate interesting information about the lives of the various Native American tribes who lived in North Carolina. Signs of Native American occupations have been found in all the state's one hundred counties. Rights relates some of the findings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 30, Dec 1943, p5-6, il
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Record #:
19541
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Rev. Rights attempts to reconstruct the state's Native American history through sparse historical records. Specifically, the article records tribes' history within the Piedmont region in Orange, Chatham, Wilkes, Carbarrus counties. He studies material culture to better understand the Native American population that once inhabited the Piedmont.
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