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30 results for Henderson, Ida Briggs
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Record #:
15377
Abstract:
Mount Mitchell, some 40 miles north of Asheville, is the tallest peak in eastern America and its forest was over-harvested in the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries. The 1914 state legislature passed regulations to cease logging and promote a conservation plan for the mountain. Mount Mitchell's development plans 21 years later included roads, reforestation programs, and a game refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p9, 21, il
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Record #:
15380
Abstract:
After George Vanderbilt died, his executors sold 86,000 acres of his property to the federal government. Congress then established a federal game preserve on the lands, and Pisgah National Forest became the first national game preserve east of the Mississippi River. Henderson discusses what the game wardens there are doing to preserve the wildlife of that section.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 27, Dec 1934, p7, il
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Record #:
15390
Abstract:
Fifty-six blind persons restored to sight; the burden of darkness through life partially lifted for 291 others. These are the accomplishments of the comparatively newly organized Mecklenburg County Association for the Blind. The Association helps with providing special glasses, Braille literature, treatment to prevent blindness in babies and children, as well as enrollment in educational and vocational programs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 2, June 1936, p5, 20, f
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Record #:
15384
Abstract:
Mrs. Findley Mast developed an interest hand weaving and traveled to the Blue Ridge Mountains to gain first-hand knowledge from generations of weavers. As she learned her craft in the western mountains, news arrived of Woodrow Wilson's daughter's, Jessie, wedding. Mrs. Mast decided to send Jessie a wedding present, a bedspread hand-woven by Mrs. Findley and the women teaching her the craft.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 11, Aug 1935, p7, 22, il
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Record #:
15396
Abstract:
Long ago the hurrying rivers of western North Carolina carved their channels deep through the hills, removing all barriers that might form lakes. Therefore there are not natural lakes in that section of the State. But man remedied this lack by building dams and impounding the water of streams and rivers into artificial lakes, until now the lovely mountain country of North Carolina may well be considered a land of lakes, there being in fourteen counties fully seventy-seven lakes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 5, July 1936, p9, 26, f
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Record #:
15402
Abstract:
Yohnalosse Trail stretched between Blowing Rock and Linville along Grandfather Mountain. North Carolina Highway Commission reopened the road to the public in 1930. The average elevation along the route is 4,000 feet, while the lowest point is at Coffey's Gap (3,500 feet) and highest at the peak of Grandfather Mountain (5,000 feet).
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 15, Sept 1935, p7, il
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Record #:
15429
Abstract:
An interesting experiment is in progress at Lees-McRae College in successfully helping propagate more game birds in that region of North Carolina. The game farm raises grouse, quail, pheasants, and turkeys to name a few varieties.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 26, Nov 1936, p5, 18, f
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Record #:
15438
Abstract:
Henderson describes what celebrating Christmas was like in North Carolina during the ante-bellum days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 30, Dec 1934, p3, 21, il
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Record #:
15451
Abstract:
About three miles to the south of Hendersonville is the Flat Rock section of the State covering several square miles, which is one of the best liked summer resorts patronized by South Carolinians. Located at Flat Rock is Saint John's in the Wilderness, a historic church built by migrating South Carolinians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 36, Feb 1937, p5, 18, 24, f
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Record #:
15462
Abstract:
There are two sports in which thousands of North Carolinians participate each fall - possum and raccoon hunting. Using packs of hunting dogs and various accoutrements, hunters try to outsmart raccoons with night hunting and climb perches to release possum from their trees.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 43, Mar 1937, p9, 16, f
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Record #:
15465
Abstract:
Lumber is a big industry in North Carolina and there are lumber mills in practically every section of the state. Nowhere, however is this industry more spectacular that at Mount Celo, in the Black Mountain range, near Mount Mitchell. Logs race down a chute at the top of Mount Celo, and then are split into halves and quarters by large steel wedges.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 46, Apr 1937, p3, 22, f
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Record #:
15500
Abstract:
The development of the dramatic arts in North Carolina has been quite interesting. Beginning with the Gifford Strolling Players as early as 1780s, North Carolina has been the home to many actors and movie stars. In 1793 New Bern vied for theatrical preeminence with the first theatrical performance given by pupils of the North Carolina school. Theatrical excellence continued in men such as John Augustin Daly, noted playwright and produce, born in Plymouth, and William Churchill DeMille, playwright, born in Washington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 41, Mar 1936, p16, 30
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Record #:
15502
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In the Sandhill region near Samarcand, the State Home and Industrial School for Girls rehabilitates troubled young women. Those sent there learn self-reliance, which included lessons in traditional female gender roles of cooking, laundry, and farming basics. The campus included an auditorium, hospital, dorms, and various administrative buildings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 45, Apr 1936, p7, 20, il
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Record #:
15519
Abstract:
Henderson continues her interview with Sara Coleman Porter, the widow of the famous short story writer, O. Henry. Mrs. Porter recounts her first meeting with O. Henry, their courtship, marriage, and brief time together before he became ill and died.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 37, Feb 1935, p8
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Record #:
15512
Abstract:
Sara Coleman Porter, who is a well-known writer in her own right, is the widow of O. Henry. She lives near Asheville. In this Henderson interview, she talks about her writing and that of O. Henry's.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 35, Jan 1935, p3, il
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