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17 results for Hayman, Donald B
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Record #:
17491
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent reports from Washington indicate that 80,000 North Carolina state, county, and municipal employees may have an opportunity to be included under the Social Security Act in the near future.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 8, May 1950, p8-12
Subject(s):
Record #:
17523
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thirty-nine North Carolina State Highway Patrolmen were promoted. The officers were promoted to fill vacancies caused by the 1951 General Assembly's addition of a 105 man troop to the Highway patrol, and by recent transfers to the expanded Auto Theft Bureau and the newly established permanent weighing stations. The promotions were made on the basis of competitive examinations.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 17 Issue 9, May 1951, p1, Inside Back Cover, f
Record #:
17522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Membership agreements permitting North Carolina counties and municipalities to bring some of their employees under Social Security will be mailed to all counties and municipalities on June 1st.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 17 Issue 8, Apr 1951, p11-12, 16
Subject(s):
Record #:
17555
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among North Carolina county officials the Merit System is a favorite topic of conversation. Their opinions very widely as to the advantages and disadvantages of present Merit System requirements. Both critics and proponents agree, however, that county officials will probably have to learn to live with the system. This article discusses personnel laws and practices in North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Oct 1951, p9-12
Record #:
17565
Author(s):
Abstract:
Both Greensboro and Guilford County officials and employees are pleased with their new job description plans. Although both plans seem to have been similarly successful in providing \"equal pay for equal work,\" they are unusual because of their striking differences.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 18 Issue 4, Dec 1951, p11-13
Record #:
17651
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of the 95,931 state, county, and municipal employees in North Carolina, approximately 84 percent belong one of the belong to one of the 39 state or local retirement plans or are covered by Federal Old Age and Survivor's Insurance. North Carolina provides a large array of retirement plans across local and state arenas.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 6, Feb 1953, p9-11, 16
Subject(s):
Record #:
17657
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolina public employees retiring in the future will be able to qualify for larger Social Security benefits if their employing governmental units act to give them retroactive coverage. To qualify for these larger benefits, public employees must pay a retroactive contribution.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 9, May 1953, p4-5
Subject(s):
Record #:
17890
Author(s):
Abstract:
School superintendents and city managers from across the state met in Chapel Hill on March 10, 1966 to discuss more coordinated efforts between the two administrative positions. Two major points of contention were issues of taxes and location of school facilities. One shining example of this presented cooperation between the Winston-Salem-Forsyth County Planning Board and school districts within Winston-Salem for balancing needs for more school grounds and also added burden to taxpayers.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 8, May 1966, p4-6, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
17903
Author(s):
Abstract:
Passage of the 1956 amendments to the Social Security Act will permit North Carolina policemen and firemen to decide if they want to be covered under Social Security. Prior to the passage of the 1956 amendments, municipal policemen and firemen were the only groups of North Carolina public officials who were still denied an opportunity.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Oct 1956, p9-10
Record #:
17945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The prestige of state government and state officials throughout the U.S. has unfortunately been lowered in the eyes of the public by recent disclosures of misconduct. Hayman, thus discusses the code of ethics for state employees that should be adopted.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 3, Nov 1957, p3, 9-10
Record #:
17947
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Police Executives Association recently adopted a resolution approved a set of physical standards and a physical examination form for police applicants.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 3, Nov 1957, p11-12
Record #:
17957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given recent affairs of the misuse of employee retirement funds, Hayman discusses the issue of North Carolina state employees and the ethical use of pensions.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 6, Mar 1958, p12-15
Record #:
17962
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the murder and accidental deaths of several North Carolina law enforcement officers, the question of survivors benefits has been raised. Hayman discusses the issues of survivors insurance and benefits, along with social security for law enforcement officers.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 8, May 1958, p13-14
Record #:
18092
Author(s):
Abstract:
On March 24, 1972, President Nixon signed the Equal Employment Opportunity Act, which extended the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to all state and local governmental employees. Hayman discusses what this means for state and local employees in North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Mar 1972, p5-6, 13
Record #:
18236
Author(s):
Abstract:
The General Assembly looked to both state and national precedents to guide legislation on governing and maintaining paperwork of state, county, and municipal employees. Personnel files were not standardized across the state often with smaller municipalities having little or no paperwork on employees while bigger cities, like Durham, had extensive records of the city's workers. Beyond disparity in record keeping, the article also discusses employee confidentiality and which forms and paperwork can be release publicly.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p24-30