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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for "Loughlin, Meredith [Photographer]"
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Record #:
21947
Abstract:
Steve Ainsworth is a retired orthopedic surgeon. In 2002, he was able pick up an activity that had interested him when he was a kid--woodworking. He has a workshop near his Washington home where he fashions works of art. He rarely buys a piece of wood because so much is available. His preferred wood is cherry, though he uses oak for furniture, and sometimes pecan branches for a particular project.
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Record #:
21950
Abstract:
Washington and Beaufort County provided eleven companies--five artillery, five infantry, and one cavalry--to the Civil War, as well as a state militia. Union forces captured the city in 1862 and held it until 1864 when they withdrew, burning most of the town behind them.
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Record #:
21959
Abstract:
A large sculpture in the lobby of the NC Estuarium greets visitors as they enter. Completed in 1998, it took artist, educator, and sculptor Whiting Toler twenty-three months to create. It has thousands of parts--driftwood in all shapes and sizes, hundreds of feet of aluminum or copper wiring, and artifacts from the state's history. Its purpose is to tell the story of the river, the estuary, and the cycle of evaporation and precipitation that causes it all to happen.
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Record #:
21962
Abstract:
Backwater Jack's Tiki Bar and Grill is a 1935 cottage located along Runyon Creek at the end of East Main Street owned by Laura Scoble and Cathy Bell. In 2011, Hurricane Irene flooded it, and it was closed for nine months. Moore recounts how local citizens came to their aid to help bring Backwater Jack's back to life.
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Record #:
21961
Abstract:
Two bread and breakfasts where visitors can stay in Washington are the Moss House Bed and Breakfast and the Pamlico House Bed and Breakfast. Voss describes them with an emphasis what each serves for breakfast.
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Record #:
21944
Abstract:
Clayborne recounts the history of Washington's Turnage Theatre. It was in danger of demolition in the 1990s, but through the efforts of a nonprofit, the theatre was restored and reopened in 2007. Clayborne's article describes the vaudeville section of the theatre on the uppermost floor. It could seat 900 and the leading vaudeville stars performed there. That section of the Turnage is still awaiting restoration.
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