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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for "Loeb, Ben F., Jr"
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Record #:
2217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loeb identifies the factors that affect automobile liability insurance for North Carolinians, and explains how rates are set in the state.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 3, Winter 1995, p34-42, il, f
Record #:
1488
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beavers, once eradicated by trapping, have made a dramatic comeback and now present landowners and officials with a dilemma: how to control the population so that such benefits as soil conservation outweigh widespread flooding and other damage.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Winter 1994, p18-23, il, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
1171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The basic system governing the sale of alcoholic beverages in North Carolina is the local option system. Local option allows the voters of each county and town to decide what alcoholic beverages legally may be sold there. This system has been modified through the years, and today faces stiff challenges.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Spring 1993, p36-42, il, f
Record #:
477
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loeb discusses the automobile insurance rate system, including the Safe Driver Insurance Plan and the Reinsurance Facility.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Winter 1987, p2-4, il, f
Record #:
18407
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, arson is a common law offense that applies to only a person who \"willfully and maliciously burns the dwelling house of another.\" Loeb discusses the growing problem with arson in North Carolina, and how it is defined legally.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
18405
Author(s):
Abstract:
The modern history of alcoholic beverage control dates from the ratification of the 18th Amendment. The age limits established in the 1930s remained 18 and 21 for beer and spirituous liquors respectively, until the 1980s when rising concern over fatalities prompted a change in the drinking age to 21. The North Carolina General Assembly adopted the legal drinking age of 21 in 1985 to avoid a 5 percent loss of federal highway funds.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Fall 1985, p13-18, map
Record #:
18426
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1981 session of the North Carolina General Assembly enacted a new law mandating the use of passenger restraint systems (safety seats or seat belts) for children under the age of two when they are riding in an automobile. Loeb discusses this law and its effectiveness.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Winter 1985, p10-12
Record #:
18424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drug trafficking of drugs such as cocaine, heroine, and marijuana are growing problems in the United States. This led north Carolina to enact strict drug-trafficking statues. Before this the law was passed in 1980, North Carolina did not set special punishments for crimes that involved very large amounts of drugs. However, under the drug-trafficking law, the punishment escalates drastically as the amount of the illegal substances increases.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p36-40
Record #:
29944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Numerous drug law cases have been decided by the North Carolina appellate courts in recent months. These decisions deal with manufacture, possession, sales, trafficking, conspiracy, search and seizure, and illegal prescriptions.
Source:
Record #:
18534
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Drug Paraphernalia Act took effect October 1, 1981. Specifically, the measure outlaws sale of drug paraphernalia by retailers and an individual can be charged with possession if found with these articles. Paraphernalia constitutes a range of items divided into twelve categories to demonstrate what could be considered for drug use and other tobacco related products that would be legal for retailers to sell.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 4, Spring 1982, p32-37, il
Record #:
29952
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s new child passenger restraint law went into effect on July 1, 1982. The law applies only to a driver transporting his or her own child of less than two years of age in a personally owned vehicle.
Source:
Record #:
18346
Author(s):
Abstract:
In recent years there has been a great deal of litigation concerning motor vehicle liability insurance rates in North Carolina. Issues include rates based on age and sex and insurance rates for motorcycles.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 44 Issue 4, Spring 1979, p12-17
Record #:
18270
Author(s):
Abstract:
For decades the North Carolina General Assembly has attempted by law to remove the drunken driver from the streets and highways of the state. Loeb discusses the various laws pertaining to the intoxicated driver and why some work and some do not.
Source:
Record #:
18307
Author(s):
Abstract:
January 1975 was the effective date of an important addition to the North Carolina Driving Under the Influence Law--an addition that made it unlawful to drive a vehicle with a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent or more, regardless of the actual extent of intoxication.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Fall 1976, p39-40
Record #:
18164
Author(s):
Abstract:
As usual, a number of bills concerning motor vehicles and highway safety were brought before the 1973 North Carolina General Assembly. The more significant ones passed concerned amendments to the driver's license law, provisions for abandoned vehicles, and reciprocal agreements that allow out-of-state drivers to receive only citations instead of jail time if their residence state accords the same privilege to North Carolina drivers.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue 9, June 1973, p43-46