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31 results for "Business North Carolina Magazine Staff"
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Record #:
14016
Abstract:
Shotwell is president of Shotwell and Partners, Inc., an advertising agency located in Charlotte. In this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine interview, he discusses the health of the advertising business and the changes brought on by the recession.
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Record #:
14021
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In this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine interview, Charles Heatherly, director of the North Carolina Department of Commerce's Travel and Tourism Division, discusses methods used to promote North Carolina and why his division has been successful during poor economic times.
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Record #:
14038
Abstract:
This directory was compiled from questionnaires returned to Business North Carolina by agencies which paid a fee for a listing. Information includes year founded, number of employees, agency specialization, current clients, and president/partners.
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Record #:
14037
Abstract:
Jesse Helms, North Carolina's senior United States Senator, has been in Congress nearly twelve years. In this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA interview, Helms discusses a wide range of topics - from the state's business climate to federal spending to politics.
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Record #:
14328
Abstract:
The staff of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine interviews gubernatorial candidates Rufus Edmisten (Democrat) and Jim Martin (Republican) for their views on business issues facing the state.
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Record #:
14750
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine and Arthur Andersen & Company second annual ranking of the state's top one hundred privately-held companies reveals a change at the top. McDevitt and Street, a Charlotte general contractor, dropped from first to third. Blue Bell, Inc., a Greensboro manufacturer of jeans and other casual and work apparel, took over the top spot.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, June 1985, p13-14, 16-18, 20, 22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
15079
Abstract:
The staff of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine asked seventeen developers and commercial real estate executives across the state to asses the current state of their field and take a look at what lies ahead. Participants included G. Smedes York, York Properties (Raleigh-Durham), David Goode, Binswanger Southern (Charlotte), and Timothy Hose, Synco (Charlotte).
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1986, p65-66, 70, 72, 76-77, 79-80, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15579
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine and Arthur Andersen & Company present their annual ranking of the state's top one hundred privately-held companies. McDevitt and Street Co., a Charlotte general contractor specializing in commercial, industrial, and institutional construction, ranked first, followed by Cone Mills Corp., a Greensboro manufacturer of textile fabrics for jeans and casual sportswear, in second place.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, June 1987, p26-27, 30, 33-37, il Periodical Website
Record #:
16694
Abstract:
A panel of business, government, and educational leaders from Pitt County and Greenville met recently in Greenville to discuss the county's economic opportunities and efforts to promote growth. The consensus was that the area is positioned to capture the benefits of the eastern part of the state's slow-but-sure economic recovery.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 32 Issue 5, May 2012, p16-18, 20, 22, 24-25, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16866
Abstract:
Publisher Ben Kinney moderated a forum on international trade and how it impacts North Carolina. The state ranks tenth nationally for employment supported by foreign company investments with over 207,000 workers. North Carolina-based businesses manufacture billions of dollars of exports which translates into more business, more jobs, and more economic diversity for the state.
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Record #:
17171
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Business leaders in Asheville and Buncombe County met to discuss the Asheville 5X5 Campaign and Buncombe's business and economic future. Launched a year ago, the Campaign seeks to raise $3 million to create 5,000 jobs in five specific job sectors. Business North Carolina provides a transcript of the meeting.
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Record #:
17184
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The state's energy industry is growing along with its energy business. The Charlotte region is the epicenter, with 27,800 jobs. Duke Energy Corp. draws engineering and manufacturing companies to the region from around the world. Legislation requiring utilities to produce energy from renewable sources is also powering growth. Five business leaders from around the state met recently to discuss their industry. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine provides a transcript of their discussions.
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Record #:
21140
Abstract:
A number of forces--tax and regulatory reform, consolidation, technology, and interest rates--are changing the face of banking in North Carolina. Business North Carolina and the North Carolina Bankers Association put together a panel of seven experts to answer questions such as can there be regulations and still prosperity for banks and how is technology changing the industry.
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Record #:
21161
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The Piedmont Triad has a long history of manufacturing--tobacco, furniture, and textiles. Now some newer industries are joining in--aviation, health care, technology, and higher education. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA assembled a staff of experts to discuss how the region's economy and its residents are being affected by these newer additions.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 33 Issue 9, Sept 2013, p10-12, 14, 16-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21187
Abstract:
The Research Triangle Metropolitan Area has a strong business environment fueled by a good workforce, stable economy, and educational assets which include topflight universities and research and technology institutions. All these characteristics make the Triangle attract to new and relocating businesses. Business North Carolina assembled a staff of experts to discuss the challenges brought by this business growth, such as an increase in population and making sure both urban and rural areas enjoy the benefits of growth.