NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


31 results for "Business North Carolina Magazine Staff"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
21140
Abstract:
A number of forces--tax and regulatory reform, consolidation, technology, and interest rates--are changing the face of banking in North Carolina. Business North Carolina and the North Carolina Bankers Association put together a panel of seven experts to answer questions such as can there be regulations and still prosperity for banks and how is technology changing the industry.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21161
Abstract:
The Piedmont Triad has a long history of manufacturing--tobacco, furniture, and textiles. Now some newer industries are joining in--aviation, health care, technology, and higher education. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA assembled a staff of experts to discuss how the region's economy and its residents are being affected by these newer additions.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 33 Issue 9, Sept 2013, p10-12, 14, 16-19, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
21187
Abstract:
The Research Triangle Metropolitan Area has a strong business environment fueled by a good workforce, stable economy, and educational assets which include topflight universities and research and technology institutions. All these characteristics make the Triangle attract to new and relocating businesses. Business North Carolina assembled a staff of experts to discuss the challenges brought by this business growth, such as an increase in population and making sure both urban and rural areas enjoy the benefits of growth.
Record #:
21257
Abstract:
The business environment is changing rapidly both at the local and national levels. High Point University and BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA \"invited three acclaimed chief executives to share their experiences and thoughts on what it takes to lead and how to assemble a team capable of navigating new challenges and meeting company goals.\"
Record #:
16694
Abstract:
A panel of business, government, and educational leaders from Pitt County and Greenville met recently in Greenville to discuss the county's economic opportunities and efforts to promote growth. The consensus was that the area is positioned to capture the benefits of the eastern part of the state's slow-but-sure economic recovery.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 32 Issue 5, May 2012, p16-18, 20, 22, 24-25, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
16866
Abstract:
Publisher Ben Kinney moderated a forum on international trade and how it impacts North Carolina. The state ranks tenth nationally for employment supported by foreign company investments with over 207,000 workers. North Carolina-based businesses manufacture billions of dollars of exports which translates into more business, more jobs, and more economic diversity for the state.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
17171
Abstract:
Business leaders in Asheville and Buncombe County met to discuss the Asheville 5X5 Campaign and Buncombe's business and economic future. Launched a year ago, the Campaign seeks to raise $3 million to create 5,000 jobs in five specific job sectors. Business North Carolina provides a transcript of the meeting.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
17184
Abstract:
The state's energy industry is growing along with its energy business. The Charlotte region is the epicenter, with 27,800 jobs. Duke Energy Corp. draws engineering and manufacturing companies to the region from around the world. Legislation requiring utilities to produce energy from renewable sources is also powering growth. Five business leaders from around the state met recently to discuss their industry. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine provides a transcript of their discussions.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12232
Abstract:
This article presents an edited transcript of a roundtable discussion by business executives and other experts about what makes a family-owned business different from commercial ones
Source:
Record #:
10114
Abstract:
The Charlotte region could have trouble sustaining its rapid growth unless infrastructure needs, including water, education, electricity, and transportation needs are soon addressed. This was the consensus of a group of Charlotte leaders, including David Jones, Clyde Higgs, Tony Zeiss, Ronnie Bryant, and Bryant Kinney.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Apr 2008, p12-14, 15, 17-22, por Periodical Website
Record #:
10109
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine asked some of the state's leaders in the biotechnology to address industry issues. The respondents were Norris Tolson, Sam Taylor, Chris Kroeger, Vipin Garg, and Sarah Yovcum.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p14-16, 17, 18-21, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
10117
Abstract:
What must the Piedmont Triad do to compete with the Research Triangle and Charlotte as well as large metro regions outside the state? The consensus of a group of regional leaders, including Don Kirkman, Rosemary Wander, Austin Pittman, Chuck Greene, and Kevin Baker, is that to be competitive the region will need the cooperation of all its cities and counties if it is to reach its full economic potential.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 28 Issue 5, May 2008, p14-16, 18, 20, 22, por Periodical Website
Record #:
13728
Abstract:
The staff of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine asked executives of five companies in North Carolina what they are doing for education and why they've chosen to get involved. The companies are Bandag, Inc. (Oxford), Carolina Power & Light (Raleigh), Glaxo, Inc. (Research Triangle Park), NCNB, Corp. (Charlotte), and RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co. (Winston-Salem).
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 10 Issue 9, Sept 1990, p16-18, 21-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
13730
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA ranks the banks operating in the state, based on their assets as of March 31. NCNB was first, followed by First Union, Wachovia, and BB&T.
Record #:
15579
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine and Arthur Andersen & Company present their annual ranking of the state's top one hundred privately-held companies. McDevitt and Street Co., a Charlotte general contractor specializing in commercial, industrial, and institutional construction, ranked first, followed by Cone Mills Corp., a Greensboro manufacturer of textile fabrics for jeans and casual sportswear, in second place.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, June 1987, p26-27, 30, 33-37, il Periodical Website