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Sarcoma

Date: 1910 | Identifier: LL02.49.00.76
Dermatologic stereoview card. Front of card shows a man's head and front torso with Sarcoma. The reverse of the card describes the dermatologic conditions as well as the diagnosis and treatment. Sarcomas are malignant connective tissue tumors which may have their origin in any organ of the body and are only occasionally primary, but not infrequently secondary, in skin. They may be classified as non-pigmented and melanotic. There is little difference in the clinical course of the two except that the melanotic form is much more malignant. A sarcoma may arise in the skin without any visible antecedent lesion, but more often it develops from a nevus, especially from one that has been irritated by trauma, cauterization or electrolysis. When the original nevus is pigmented but not necessarily in the same degree. Melanotic sarcomas vary in color from grayish brown to bluish black. A nevus that has undergone malignant transformation first gives evidence of the fact, as a rule, by an increase in size or change of color. more...
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