E. C. Winslow Records, 1791-1997, undated

Manuscript Collection #1174

  • Descriptive Summary
     
    Title: E. C. Winslow Records
    Creator: Winslow, E. C. (Edward Cyrus), 1886-
    Repository: ECU Manuscript Collection
    Language: English
    Abstract: This collection (1791-1960) documents the horse and mule business, farm operations, land transactions, saw mill operation, and other business enterprises of Edward Cyrus Winslow (b. 1886) of Tarboro, Edgecombe County, N.C. Included in the collection are correspondence, financial and legal records such as account books, ledgers, bills and receipts, contracts with other mule dealers, promissory notes, agricultural liens and chattel mortgages, deeds, and lease and rental agreements. Also included are superior court records, blueprints of farm tracts and dairy equipment, printed material, business and family photographs, and a small quantity of family correspondence.
    Extent: 24.5 Cubic feet, 47 boxes and one oversized folder, consisting of correspondence, account books, ledgers, deeds, photographs, printed material, promissory notes, agricultural liens, chattel mortgages, lease and rental agreements, receipts, travel brochures, booklets, postcards, and blueprints.
  • Description
     

    The Edward Cyrus (E.C.) Winslow Records (1791-1960) document his horse and mule business, farm operations, land transactions, saw mill operation, and other business enterprises headquartered in Tarboro, Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Though established in Tarboro, E.C. Winslow did business throughout the area, including the North Carolina counties of Sampson, Edgecombe, Nash, Martin, Halifax and Wilson, as well as in the cities of Greenville and Rocky Mount. Among the records are business and personal correspondence, account books, ledgers, receipts, contracts, promissory notes, agricultural liens and chattel mortgages, deeds, lease and rental agreements, superior court records, blueprints of farm tracts and dairy equipment, ephemera, printed material and photographic images.

    The papers are divided into eight series: Personal Correspondence, Other Personal Correspondence, Business Correspondence, Financial Papers, Legal Papers, Ephemera, Photographs Images, and Oversized Items. For further details, please see the series descriptions below.

    Series 1: Personal Correspondence

    The expansive Personal Correspondence series is further divided into sub-series by the correspondent. The one exception is correspondence with Mary and Margaret Winslow. In this case, both sets of their letters are grouped together. This was done because the sisters (twins) generally pursued similar interests and careers, shared living accommodations and in a few instances both signed some of the letters sent to their brother E.C. Winslow. The bulk of the Personal Correspondence includes letters between E.C. Winslow and his immediate family members. These include his sisters, Mary and Margaret (twins), Anna, and Isabella. Isabella married Dr. Albert J. McCulloch, professor at Albion College in Albion, Michigan. They had two children, Margaret and Robert. A sizable amount of correspondence between E.C. Winslow and all four McCulloch family members is present. Besides individuals, some of the correspondence is between E.C. Winslow and livestock businesses. However, it should be noted that in every case, E.C. Winslow shared both a professional and personal relationship with the company’s owners. As a result, both business and personal topics are discussed in the letters. It also appears from various other references in the papers, that many of these business owners and their families were childhood friends with C.J. One example is the family of A.L Younger, who was part owner of Davis and Younger based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Other livestock businesses that E.C. corresponds with include C.B. Team Mule Company in Wichita, Kansas, and Charles Price in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma. Also much correspondence can be found between E.C. Winslow and his father, C.J., and uncle, A.T., both partners in Winslow Brothers and Company based in Kansas City, Missouri. In addition, a large portion of correspondence between E.C. Winslow and E.J. “Ed” Cox (E.C.’s cousin) is also present. Cox also owned a horse and mule business and was based in Clarkton, North Carolina. He also sold buggies and began selling Ford automobiles and trucks in the region as early as 1918.

    We find from Mary’s correspondence (1915) that she is in Kansas City with her father who is at the time in bad health. She also writes that her mother is suffering from rheumatism. Mary also explains details happening in her city, including a large tabernacle being built for future Billy Sunday sermons (1916.) By this time, Margaret had already left home and was employed. There is also mention of an infant relative that dies early and the circa 1880s Bible where it is recorded and that she’d like the grave to be marked. Mary also mentions the idea of selling the house in Kansas City, as it is not equipped to rent. By 1918, Margaret leaves with Mary to Decatur, Illinois. Of particular interest are Mary’s comments on the perception of women’s roles at that time (1920). Also found are comments on the Winslow family’s forefathers from the areas of Maine and Boston, and “The Winslow House in Plymouth,” built in 1734.

    Margaret speaks of her and Mary’s work for the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA.) From 1918-1922, though travelling much, they appear to be based in Decatur, Illinois. Both sisters have plans for travel and later study to further their careers in the mission field. During a brief time, they report they are at the University of California at Berkley, taking appropriate classes to help them with their jobs. Other correspondence mentions bad health conditions of their uncle A.T. (1922). In 1922, both sisters plan and take a European trip, assumed as part of their service with the YWCA, and much correspondence is sent to E.C. Winslow offering details of their travels. By 1923, Mary and Margaret are both headquartered in Clarksburg, West Virginia, and after that, Lynchburg, Virginia. Additional correspondence with E.C. mentions the sisters’ work, as well as the handling of interest money owed to them from various farms and mortgage rents back in North Carolina. They also mention investing some of the money in U.S. Bonds. Also mentioned are the challenges of keeping their dog, “Bobby Burns” while moving and renting various places to live. Margaret and Mary’s correspondence with E.C. goes on until the mid-1940s. The rest of the letters mainly focus on financial payments, activities and travel by the sisters, as well as news about the family and their occasional visits to see family members.

    From Anna’s correspondence we learn that she enrolled at Cornell University in 1919. She appears to be more of the “free spirit” type than her other siblings. However, she is very much involved in the family financial business, as there are many back and forth messages regarding money with her brother, E.C. Winslow. Most of the letters are sent to him, but some are sent to her as well regarding rent and other expenses. Of particular interest is a letter describing the Kansas City election of March 27, 1934. Anna explains in detail that affiliates were found murdered and many people were injured from the violence surrounding the event. In addition, in a 1944 letter, it is mentioned that Kansas City has started a campaign for 30,000 more war plant workers, while at the same time plants are turning away people by the hundreds. In 1945, Anna mentions financial related news from eastern North Carolina including the sale of property to people in Princeville, North Carolina, referred to here as the “negro” town. She also mentions large amounts of timber being sold off and the construction of a tobacco barn on the Green Place. In February 1945 she complains to E.C. Winslow of a serious eye ailment. By 1946, Anna has moved to New Mexico for health reasons and offers details of her condition in her letters. Also found in Anna’s correspondence are news items (accompanied by clippings) related to Quakers in the United States. Letters (1918) from Isabella to E.C. Winslow describe family history as well as topics related to family estate monies. As with most other correspondence between E.C. Winslow and his siblings, financial news and transactions are topics included as well. Isabella’s correspondence (1918) discusses a division of inheritance money that took place during a physical meeting of the family in Kansas City. Also of note, is her mention of the influenza outbreak during that same year. She goes into great detail, mentioning that workplaces and schools have been closed for two weeks with no relief in sight. Also of interest, she mentions cherished Christmas traditions including sending a box of holly to family and friends. In addition, there is correspondence (1918) to C. Edmonsen of Tarboro regarding the letter grade given by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (Raleigh office) of cotton bales produced back in North Carolina. Undated correspondence speaks of her father, C.J., having a medical operation as a last resort for saving his life.

    There is also a significant amount of correspondence between Isabella’s husband, Dr. Albert J. McCulloch, professor at Albion College in Albion, Michigan, and E.C. Winslow. Much discussion of financial matters exists between the two. The bulk of this focuses on legal matters related to the family estate, money owed from interest gained on real estate transactions, including many mortgages of farms back in North Carolina. E.C. Winslow also corresponds with the McCulloch’s children, Robert and Margaret. These letters consist of personal news, in addition to more discussion of financial family interests.

    Letters between E.C. Winslow and Davis and Younger mule company are mostly written by A.L. Younger, half-owner of the business. The correspondence includes both personal and business topics. Some of the earliest letters (circa 1920) have Younger requesting mules and horses from “Old Mexico” and mentions attending government auctions. There is also constant discussion of the cost of hay, mules and shipping rates. From the tone of the letters, the two clearly have a friendly relationship, as they both talk of visiting each other and asking about each other’s family members. There are also references in other parts of the collection (some in photographs) that indicates the Younger Family and Winslow Family lived near each other in past years. Also present is detailed information on crops, including tobacco, cotton and corn. Later letters also mention the continuing failing health of A.L. Younger, and his eventual death. Other letters focus on Younger’s sons’ discussion of the reorganization of the business after their father’s death. Younger’s sons also mention to E.C. Winslow about the possibility of shipping “coons” for mating.

    Correspondence with C.B. Team mule company includes attached sales receipts documenting mules shipped to E.C. Winslow. This material offers many details regarding prices, condition and shipping procedures. C.B. Team also mentions that it is taking longer for mule shipments due to Army movements in the area (1942-1943). Team also mentions his cotton crop and the result of the Boll Weevil on it. In addition, he also speaks of E.C. Winslow’s tobacco crop (1944). Charles Price was another major shipper of mules that E.C. utilized often. Highlights of their correspondence include a mention that gnats had killed over 300 mules in Price’s territory. Price also speaks of the condition of mules shipped, how poor his cotton crop is (1937) and tobacco prices in the east (1940). There is voluminous correspondence between E.C. Winslow and his father and uncle’s business in Kansas City, Missouri, Winslow Brothers and Company. This correspondence contains both business and personal matters, many times mixed within the same letters. The correspondence comments on crops in Pitt County, North Carolina (1903) and finances, including the mention of receipts for mules, horses and ponies sold to E.C. Winslow in Tarboro. A.T. and C.J. also state that mule prices are higher than ever (1914) and talk of the British Army possibly staking lots of horse and mules which could lead to eventual higher prices. Basically, they explain that at present they are investing in cattle, loaning out money (at eight percent) and speculating on cotton prices. They also tell E.C. Winslow they are not keeping any money in the bank because it’s too scarce, and at this time, they can use all they can get, further claiming they could loan a million dollars at eight percent if they had it. There is also discussion of sending funds and they both ask E.C. Winslow to look into their company affairs back in North Carolina. They also mention they’d like to go south for their health and in one letter states the temperature is fifteen below zero.

    E.C. and his cousin, E.J. “Ed” Cox (located in Clarkton, North Carolina), correspond about various business ventures and speculations. Already selling horses, mules and buggies, by 1918, Cox is also selling Ford automobiles and trucks in the region, bragging he could sell all the Fords he could get. He mentions that the shipment of E.C.’s ordered Ford car is late being shipped and also gives him advice on where to buy mules (1919). In one letter, Cox states to E.C. that “the Weevil has gotten every thing (sic) on top.” (1921). Topics also include the passing of C.J. Winslow, E.C. Winslow’s father selling and buying peanuts and peas, the results of a Boll Weevil report conducted at the University of Florida being sent to E.C. Winlslow (1922), and the growing market for Ford trucks in the. By 1937, Cox reports to E.C. that “Aunt Jennie” has died and that he has gone with the body back to Indiana for the burial.

    Series 2: Other Personal Correspondence

    A smaller portion of personal correspondence is located in a separate series entitled “Other Personal Correspondence.” Much of this material contains letters from E.C. Winslow’s children, Franklin (“Dutch”), Grace (“Runt”) and Edward, Jr. In addition, much correspondence can be found between E.C. Winslow and his sister Edith (Winslow) Whitlark and her son, Ralph. Edith was married to Henry Benson Whitlark, originally from Kansas City.

    In addition, there is correspondence between E.C. Winslow and another livestock dealer, Red Shaw of Memphis, Tennessee. Their letters cover both business and personal topics and prove the two were obviously close friends. E.C. Winslow also gets many letters from a friend named T.H. Sanders who appears (via the letterhead used) to work for the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. One other friend is Kate Oates who writes to E.C. Winslow quite often discussing money needed by her from C.J. Other letters are from a variety of friends and family members, many of which concern the history and latest news on the Winslow family. Correspondents include Laura Winslow, E.C. Winslow, Jack Sledge, Sarah White, Corporal John Pittman and other livestock dealers.

    Looking at letters from Franklin (“Dutch”) we learn that he is an Army Private at Fort Sill, Oklahoma (1942). Franklin goes into detailed description of his visit to Charles Price and the many operating oil wells he sees there. Related to this trip, Franklin also comments on the buying and selling of mules and offers his opinions. In a letter (1943) written from Fort Reno, Oklahoma, he tells his father that he is checking on all types of crops, oil and other commodities. By 1944, Franklin is still discussing mule sales and other agricultural ventures and also mentions the other men in his squadron. During this same year, he tells his father he is buying war bonds for him and E.C. Winslow offers him details of crop conditions and prices back in North Carolina, including corn, tobacco and wheat. E.C. Winslow also offers Franklin advice on what type of mules he should be buying and other money and business-related suggestions.

    Letters from Grace (“Runt”) includes some to her mother and father. Her early letters are written from Westtown School, Westtown, Pennsylvania, where she is apparently attending. Later, she is writing to say she is enrolled at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina (W.C.U.N.C.) in Greensboro, North Carolina. In one of the letters (1944) she mentions a little “political disagreement” she had with her father in relation to Thomas Dewey and taxes, comments the university has them raking leaves due to a shortness of labor, and exclaims “it’s becoming a woman’s world.”

    A letter from Edward, Jr. (1935) offers detailed insight to his father of the cost of used cars around different regions of the country. Also discussed is family news (1936), as well as E.C. Winslow offering his son options for which college to attend, mentioning that one school “is known only to a few Quakers” (1938).

    Edith and Ralph Whitlark’s correspondence (1918) mentions trips they are making, opinions on buying and selling land, and requests of E.C. They also ask E.C. Winslow for money. Also of interest, they mention driving into Chicago on The Lincoln Highway. Also sent to E.C. Winslow are itemized statements documenting interest earned on a financial account (1921) and a few postcards sent while traveling (1922). Writing from Birmingham, Alabama, Ralph mentions a nine percent cut in his salary and the fact that the steel business is “shaky” (1938). At this time, he states that he is recovering at a government hospital, Lawson General Hospital, in Atlanta, Georgia. In letters between E.C. Winslow and Red Shaw, Shaw tells him that he is scouring the country to buy pack mules for the U.S. Government, and mentions specific prices paid for mules (1940s). Also included is documentation of many recent mule sale transactions between the two.

    E.C. also corresponds with T.H. Sanders of the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. In 1935, he mentions the death of Mrs. McCulloch (Isabella) and is available to help sort out Isabella’s affairs if needed (1938). Sanders also mentions noticing a wild west show, Col. Tim McCoy’s Show, go bankrupt and says he will check on their inventory. In addition, Sanders offers details of local crops, livestock and dairy, and thanks E.C. for gifts of food and wishes the family well. Regarding his job, Sanders tell E.C. Winslow that “the place is going to close up fast” and that he needs to go find another job (1940).

    Other assorted letters include one written (1901) from Kansas City by Laura Winslow in which she describes the family and their latest activities and travels. In other correspondence from various individuals one can find specific readings of grades of cotton by a North Carolina state agency (1918), as well as a mention of E.C. Winslow donating a piano to Howard Memorial Presbyterian Church in Tarboro (1930s.) There are a few letters (1934 and 1935) to E.C. from “Aunt Sallie” describing news of distant family members, and a letter (1937) to E.C. Winslow from a cousin regarding Aunt Sallie’s worsening medical condition. In addition are letters from other livestock dealers offering E.C. the latest news on mules and other occurrences in the business. One of the letters is from Jack Sledge at Camp Lee, Virginia, which also includes an "S" gas ration decal. (1942)

    Highlights of further correspondence include an undated letter to E.C. Winslow thanking him for money he loaned to a student to begin taking classes at East Carolina Teachers College in Greenville, North Carolina (1930s), discussion of E.C. Winslow’s bad health with Sarah White (of Guilford College) and “Aunt Sallie” (1942). Also present are a few letters from Corporal John Pittman (soon to be named Sergeant) located at Camp Polk, Louisiana. In these letters, E.C. Winslow mentions to Pittman that he has lost the use of his hands and does not have the ability to write any longer (1944).

    Final letters in the assorted correspondence include some written to relatives discussing the genealogy of the Winslow Family, the estate of J.R. Ragan (husband of Mary Elizabeth Winslow), and statements from E.C. Winslow on John Pittman’s good character and health situation (1945). Included in these letters are a listing of Cyrus J. Winslow’s heirs and another family list that begins with the children of Nathan Winslow, again tying into the estate of the deceased J.R. Ragan (1945). The latest letters (1960) consist of two Winslow family relatives offering great insight into E.C. Winslow’s relationships with regional people, his business and overall career. One of the relatives worked for E.C. from 1919 until 1934. The letters mention that the largest number of mules sold in a year was around 1000 to 1200 and that normal sales figures were around 300 to 500 per year. The individual also mentions specific farms in the area, as well as the specific location where E.C. began his business. The letters reveal that E.C. Winslow sold much hay and corn and that he once “boot legged Fords and did a real business in them.” (As opposed to “moonshine” activity, this reference is assumed to refer to selling Ford vehicles gotten through his cousin, E.J. Cox.) The letters also emphasize that although established in Tarboro, E.C. Winslow did business throughout the area, including the North Carolina counties of Sampson, Edgecombe, Nash, Martin, Halifax, Nash and Wilson, as well as in the cities of Greenville and Rocky Mount. One writer indicates that E.C. Winslow has not been well for nearly fifteen years. This person also speaks of E.C. Winslow’s past beginning when he left Kansas City and also goes into great detail about the local surroundings and E.C. Winslow’s business in its early formation. E.C. Winslow is portrayed as always being very fair and willing to help out countless other farmers in the area by giving them the cash to buy farm supplies until their crops came in.

    Series 3: Business Correspondence

    The Business Correspondence focuses on a variety of activity surrounding E.C. Winslow’s various business endeavors. Topics of agriculture include a letter which consists of correspondence (1906) from the Office of the Quartermaster, 11th Cavalry (Army) in Fort Des Moines, Iowa, introducing E.C. Winslow as an employee of the U.S. who will accompany a railway car of stock (mules) from Kansas City, Missouri, to Des Moines, Iowa. The letter is accompanied by a copy of an official sworn document placing E.C. Winslow in charge and U.S. War Department payment vouchers. In addition, included is an undated North Carolina State Board of Health Dairy Farm inspection form, listings (1936-1947) of regional producers from which milk was purchased by the municipal milk plant in Tarboro. This is significant because this milk plant was originally established in 1918 by Tarboro City Council, after making it illegal for unpasteurized milk or cream to be sold within the city limits. The plant was the first of its kind in the country, and allowed local producers to bring their milk to be pasteurized and sold. Also present in this series are livestock transport contracts with The Wabash Railroad Company (1905-1906) and many statements from various financial institutions, most of which are regionally located. One noted exception is statements from Merchant’s National Bank in Richmond, Virginia. Another important item included in the correspondence is a 1918 financial survey done by The Real Estate and Trust Company of Greensboro, North Carolina, of E.C. Winslow’s farm and saw mill operation.

    Also in this series is correspondence relating to the purchase of several types of hay (1920s), inquiries to the South Bend Chilled Plow Company (1921) and much more description related to farming and agriculture in the area. Other topics covered include the local price for cotton and peanuts and a document discussing an experiment by the University of Missouri, Columbia Experiment Station on corn hybrids, indicating that there are no seeds developed yet (1934).

    Additional correspondence consists of a letter from the COOP Extension (State of North Carolina) regulating the destruction of any overproduction of cotton, as well as a mention of a tobacco adjustment payment (1935). Other references to agriculture tests and legislation include a final report of a germination test of seed (cotton) by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture (1936), a detailed crop report from “soil lab,” Farm Cotton Oil Company (1938), an announcement of payment for cotton planted from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), materials sent by the USDA related to a cotton adjustment plan (1939) and a notice from USDA that a herd of cattle is due a tuberculosis test.

    Also of interest in this series is a letter (1918) from Cross Press and Sign Company in which the company representative confirms an inquiry about advertising signs for E.C. Winslow’s mule business, mentioning that he has asked for 4,000 signs, about the size of 16 by 20 inches in size. This sizable request by E.C. Winslow offers another hint of how large the region was that he was targeting in his business ventures. Also of interest is a city ordinance (Tarboro) sent out to residents “against begging and preventing picture agents working in and taking order for enlarging pictures.” Other correspondence includes stocking samples of pure Japanese silk thread attached to the letter (1921), an article on how to control tuberculosis (1928), and evidence that E.C. Winslow was still being charged for city taxes in Kansas City (1930s).

    Also of importance is a wholesale price list of parts from the Nissen Wagon Company (Forsyth County, North Carolina) and a document related to discussion by a University of Illinois professor of causes of gastro-entriktis in horses (1939). In 1940, a letter is sent granting E.C. Winslow an extension to file his tax returns from the previous year, as well as a letter from the Edgecombe County Electric Membership Corporation looking for residences that had yet “to be wired.”

    World War II-era materials of interest include a letter announcing the opening of an “outpost office” in the courtroom town hall at Tarboro for the Cooperative Extension Work, Agriculture and Home Economy, State of North Carolina. This office was related to unemployment compensation and claims that tobacco farmers will be getting harvest hands for assistance (1941). Also present is a letter from the Office of Civil Defense thanking E.C. Winslow for a donation of scrap iron and a letter informing farmers of a U.S. Agriculture referendum which establishes peanut production quotas. From the same year of 1941, correspondence can be found related to a low supply of raw materials to fill a pocket knife order placed by E.C. Winslow, a transfer of title from the American Guernsey Cattle Club and a standard letter from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to “all eligible wheat producers” regarding the U.S. Agricultural Conservation Program and mention of wheat quotas.

    Other letters of note include a request allotment from the Tarboro Gasoline Ration Board, a document offering “certified of war necessity vehicle” status for E.C. Winslow’s dairy farm and a letter from the Chaplain at the North Carolina Rehab Prison in Raleigh asking E.C. Winslow to re-employ a recently released prisoner (1942). A few letters include contracts for the employment by E.C. Winslow of individuals from the Tarboro Prisoner of War Camp and a letter of concern by the Edgecombe-Halifax District Health Department regarding cows not being tested for tuberculosis at one of Winslow’s farms (1943). From the years 1944-1947, correspondence of interest includes a Dairy Feed Adjustment Payment from the USDA, a brochure advertising flame guns for burning ditch banks, and brochures advertising and explaining the benefits of growing kudzu.

    Series 4: Financial Papers

    The Financial Papers series is further divided into two sub-series, Receipts and Ledger Books. Receipts (1850-1947, undated) document purchases and sales for a variety of agricultural materials and supplies, including lumber, guano, cotton and peanuts. Also present are a large amount of receipts documenting the buying and purchasing of livestock, much of this pertaining to mules. In addition, there are Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company loss and damage claims (1924-1929) relating to the transport of mules, and there are many cancelled checks from local and regional banks, livestock sellers, and tax receipts, some dating as far back as 1850s-1860s. The majority of these early receipts are for Charles Starbuck of Guilford County, North Carolina.

    The Ledger Books contain a variety of transactions and documentation including cash received, cash paid and inventories. The bulk of the ledgers are in folders and standard boxes, while a small part of the ledgers are housed in oversized boxes as indicated on the container list. The creators of the ledgers include Winslow Brothers (1912-19), C.J. Winslow (1913-1919), E.C. Winslow (1903-1947) and unidentified creators. The bulk of the unidentified creators and Winslow Brothers ledger books document activity taking place in Kansas City, Missouri. Of particular interest near the back pages of the unidentified ledger book (1819-1827) is a short reference related to Mr. Simon Nobels and a transaction mentioning a “negro by the name of Tony.”

    Series 5: Legal Papers

    Legal Papers include property liens, mortgages, court cases (many of which are bankruptcy filings and land rights litigation), insurance policies, crop liens, deeds of trust, agreements and indentures. All of the Legal Papers series are filed alphabetically for ease of identification of the person(s) involved.

    Included in the legal papers are early agreements between A.T. and C. J. Winslow (1887), as well as the original article of co-partnership between the two to form their business (1888). In addition, are many legal documents between Anna Winslow and Margaret Winslow and other Winslow family members (circa 1880s). The earliest document identified is a deed for land (indenture) in Guilford County between Joseph Miller (included in the M files) and Samuel Benson (1791). Also included is a small map of the Farrar Farm operated by E.C. Winslow (revised 1940), many fire insurance policies for buildings, (mostly owned by E.C. Winslow, of which a few are located in Kansas City), contracts for fifty tons of nitrate of soda sold to E.C. Winslow (1924), documents related to Ford vehicles sold by E.J. Cox to E.C. Winslow (1925) and a cooperative tuberculosis eradiation certificate from the USDA certifying that the herd of eighty-seven Grade Jersey cattle owned by E.C. Winslow is tuberculosis-free (1935).

    Series 6: Ephemera

    Ephemera consists of early twentieth century sales catalogs related to construction and farm implements, Certificates of War Necessity (1942), Rand, McNally and Company maps of Mississippi, North Carolina and Missouri (circa 1900), tuberculosis eradication certificates (1935), certificates of membership in Edgecombe-Martin Counties Electric Membership Corporation (1939), a Royster Almanac (1936), North Carolina sales tax regulations (1937) and a price list for handmade halters and bridles (undated).

    Included in the Ephemera series are early twentieth century catalogs related to construction, farm equipment, raising mules for profit and sporting goods. Of particular interest is a U.S. Department of Agriculture bulletin (1938) titled “Mule Production.” Also present are advertising ink pads featuring local businesses, a copy of the North Carolina Sale Tax Code (1937) and a bulletin from the Office of Defense Transportation, entitled “Instructions For Preparing Application For Certificate Of War Necessity (1942). Other material consists of clippings (1954, undated) about a yacht built for Edger E. (B.?) Younger and one of Younger and Mrs. Younger with a sailfish caught in Texas. Edger Younger is assumed to be a relative of A.L. Younger, part owner of Davis and Younger. Also included is a typescript poem (undated), clippings during WWII and events in the Kansas City area, a few postcards of Arizona and Kansas, C.J. Winslow’s leather wallet and a blank monthly inspection card for E.C. Winslow’s Marmon 34 automobile. Also of importance is a “Book of Instructions and Repair Price List for the ‘New Way’ Vertical Oil Engine” (circa 1900) and colorfully illustrated catalog and price list for “Clipper Cleaners for Grain, Seeds and Beans” (1942).

    Series 7: Photographic Images

    Photographic Images consist of both positive images and negative images in black and white and color versions. Images represented by both formats will not be repeated in the description. The images are further divided between identified and unidentified. The absence of a date after the description indicates the image is undated. All of the color images are positive images of E.C. Winslow’s barn on West Granville Street in Tarboro, North Carolina (1983). Several of the black and white positive images under the “architecture and buildings” category document E.C. Winslow’s stable and office on East Granville Street in Tarboro, North Carolina (1980s).

    Other identified black and white images are of Leon, Earnest and Alex Younger as children (1923), Ed and Eva Cox and babies, Margaret Davis (1948), Bruce Williams and Mary Latham, Franklin, Edward, Jr., Grace and Anna (E.C. Winslow’s children, 1928), E.C Winslow and wife Margaret, Mr. Witmer (?), Louise Probasco (?) Bassett, William and wife Sarah, C. Key (Charlie), F.D. Winslow in uniform, Owald Hyman (?), overseer, Margaret Davis, senior class photograph at Guilford College, North Carolina (1909) and a group photo of siblings Margaret Winslow, E.C. Winslow, Mary Winslow, Isabella (Winslow) McCulloch, Edith (Winslow) Whitlark and Anna Winslow (1931). Unidentified categories include people, architecture and buildings, agriculture and animals (horses, mules and tobacco crops), transportation and travel (includes a river cruise, people with automobiles and people with buggies) and a memorial cemetery. Photographs removed from cardboard portrait frames (also included) consist of a group photo taken at Rufus King’s home of C.J. Winslow, Laura Ann (White) Winslow, Anna, Isabella, Mary, Margaret, E.C. Winslow and Edith (1890), Edith Laura Winslow (in Kansas City) and several unidentified women. The bulk of the negatives are the same images as the positive images. The few that are not, are unidentified and of similar subject matter as the unidentified positive image category.

    Series 8: Oversized Items

    Included in the Oversized Items are detailed instructions for erecting Louden steel cow stalls and mangers produced by the Louden Manufacturing Company, Fairfield, Iowa (undated), plan drawings of Louden cow stalls (1932-1933), and two Winslow Family genealogy charts, one documenting several centuries, but limited in scope (1940), and another documenting lineage from the late 1800s to modern times (1997.) Also included are two examples of the advertising “top half” of an E.C. Winslow’s business calendar, a drawing of Pippen Farm in Edgecombe County, North Carolina (1917), another drawing of Pippen Farm owned by E.C. Winslow (1939, revised 1940), a drawing of W.L. Speight’s property, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina (1927), a drawing of R.H. Moore Farm, Rocky Mount, North Carolina, owned by Rocky Mount Realty and Insurance Company (1919), and another drawing of Moore Farm, Rocky Mount, North Carolina, owned by E.C. Winslow (1940). Also included in this series is a hand-drawn property deed (indenture) for Andrew Lindsay’s land in Guilford County (1832); two hand-drawn maps of Davenport Farm (1936, undated); a blueprint drawing (1948) of property owned by Franklin D Winslow, also known as Kea Farm, near Lawrence, North Carolina, Edgecombe County; a blueprint drawing of a sub-division owned by Franklin D. Winslow (1946); a small poster from the early twentieth century-era advertising a Polo Tournament and Gymkhana at Fort Reno Polo Grounds in Oklahoma; and another early twentieth century-era poster advertising mule auctions by Davis and Younger in Oklahoma City.

    Other oversized items of interest consist of a cardboard poster announcing a concert by Chowan College Quartette to be held at The Opera House under the auspices of Woman’s Missionary Society to benefit New Methodist Church (circa 1924), a fold-out price list for the food wholesale company T.W. Wood and Associations in Richmond, Virginia (1944), and a recently taken copy of a color photo of Winslow family descendants holding up an original, large color advertising banner promoting E.C. Winslow Mules.

  • Biographical / Historical Note
     

    Cyrus Julian (C.J.) Winslow, Edward Cyrus (E.C.) Winslow’s father, was born in 1852. Among C.J.’s siblings were Abner Thomas (A.T.) and a sister Mary. C.J., A.T. and Mary were all raised in a Quaker community in the New Garden area, near present day Guilford College in Guilford County (possibly Randolph County), North Carolina. Family lore has it that that their father (Nathan Winslow, from Randolph County, North Carolina) was dismissed from his local Quaker congregation for raising tobacco. C.J., a farmer and horse trader, moved with his future wife Laura to Goldsboro, North Carolina, and later to Green Mountain, Tennesee, while A.T. moved temporarily to Indiana. Eventually, C.J. and A.T. moved to Kansas City, Missouri, where they partnered to form Winslow Brothers, Incorporated. This business, a mule wholesaler, proved very successful for them. C.J. (and possibly Laura) are buried at William Rockhill Nelson Cemetery in Kansas City.

    Cyrus Julian (C.J.) Winslow married Laura White in 1878. They had the following children: Edward Cyrus (E.C.) (born 1886), Margaret and Mary (twins), Edith, Anna, and Isabella. Isabella later married Dr. Albert McCollough, professor at Albion College in Albion, Michigan. For more detailed genealogy of the Winslow family, see the two Winslow Family genealogy charts in the oversized Items series. During E.C. Winslow’s childhood (before his family established themselves in Kansas City) they also lived in Wayne County, North Carolina, and Green Mountain, Tennessee. E.C. graduated from grade school and from Central High School in Kansas City. He did not pursue further formal education, but some of his sisters did attend college. E.C. initially lived in Tarboro, North Carolina, on a seasonal basis for some period before permanently leaving Kansas City in 1913 and moving to Tarboro to establish a mule retail business. In addition, three of E.C.’s cousins (including Ed Cox) also returned to eastern North Carolina to establish similar businesses in the towns of Scotland Neck, Greenville and Clarkton.

    E.C. and his future wife Margaret Davis had been acquaintenances as children. Margaret was from Guilford County and her family was also part of the Quaker community there. Margaret’s father was a professor of languages and religion at Guilford College in North Carolina. E.C. and Margaret were married in 1916. They had the following children: E.C. Jr., Grace (“Runt”), Ann, and Franklin (“Dutch”). Both sons settled in Edgecombe County, also establishing agricultural businesses.

    Though established in Tarboro, E.C. Winslow did business throughout the area, including the North Carolina counties of Sampson, Edgecombe, Nash, Martin, Halifax, Nash and Wilson, as well as in the cities of Greenville and Rocky Mount. E.C. Winslow, Jr., managed the horse and mule business until the mid 1950’s when it proved to no longer be a profitable enterprise.

  • Administrative Information
     
    Accessions Information

    November 30, 2010, (processed) 8.0 cubic feet; Records (ca. 1905-ca. 1947) documenting the horse and mule business, farm operations, land transactions, saw mill operation, and other business enterprises of Edward Cyrus Winslow (b. 1886) of Tarboro, Edgecombe County, N.C. Records include correspondence, account books, ledgers, bills and receipts, contracts with other mule dealers, promissory notes, agricultural liens and chattel mortgages, deeds, lease and rental agreements, superior court records, blueprints of farm tracts and dairy equipment, and printed material. Also included is a small quantity of family correspondence. Donor: James W. Winslow.

    February 10, 2013, (processed addition 1) 5.0 cubic feet; Records (ca. 1895-1948) including correspondence, financial records, blueprints, photograph and printed material. [received October 12, 2012] Donor: James W. Winslow.

    February 10, 2013, (processed addition 2) 1.0 cubic feet; E. C. Winslow’s business records (ca. 1916-1928) related to the selling of hogs. Included are business correspondence, invoices and railway shipping records; and correspondence to E. C. Winslow from A. L. Younger which also contains some shipping records and financial documents. [received January 25, 2013] Donor: James W. Winslow.

    February 28, 2013, (processed addition 3) 3.5 cubic feet; Records (ca. 1890-1938) include photographs (business and family related), correspondence, financial records, maps, and printed miscellany. [received 2/26/2013] Donor: James W. Winslow.

    August 4, 2015, (processed addition 4) 0.5 cubic feet; Records (ca. 1928-ca. 1934) including business correspondence to and from E. C. Winslow. Donor: Edward C. Winslow III.

    September 29, 2016, (unprocessed addition 5) 1.5 cubic feet; Included are a small amount of personal and business correspondence (1907-1911, 1941) concerning E. C. Winslow and also Winslow Stables in Kansas City, Missouri; Tarboro, NC, advertising items; travel brochures (received from a travel agent in Kansas City), postcards, and booklets (1907-1911) related to cruise lines (Allan Line Royal Mail Steamers, American Line, North German Lloyd Steamship Co., White Star Dominion, Hamburg-American Line, Holland-American Line, and Cunard Line); and brochures for rail lines (London & South Western Railway and Great Eastern Railway of England). Other booklets (1907-1911) encourage people to travel to Europe, Algeria, and Tunisia. As much as two thirds of this addition are receipts for stores in the Tarboro area and they will be offered to Dr. James Winslow, grandson of E. C. Winslow. (Rec'd. 2/12/2016) Donor: Monika Fleming.

    September 29, 2016, (unprocessed addition 6) 3.0 cubic feet; A. E. Winslow material related to travel in the 1920's. Includes some memorabilia and other related materials. (Rec'd. 3/21/2016) Donor: James W. Winslow

    Acquisition Information

    Gift of James W. Winslow
    Gift of Edward C. Winslow III
    Gift of Monika Fleming

    Access Restrictions

    No restrictions

    Copyright Notice

    Literary rights to specific documents are retained by the authors or their descendants in accordance with U.S. copyright law.

    Preferred Citation

    E. C. Winslow Records (#1174), East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J. Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.

    Processing Information

    Encoded by Apex Data Services

    Processing completed by Dale Sauter on January 26, 2016.

Container List

  • Business Correspondence
     

    Materials include livestock transport contracts, correspondence (1906) from the Office of the Quartermaster, 11th Calvary (Army) in Fort Des Moines, Iowa, a letter from Cross Press and Sign Company regarding advertising signs, financial materials related to leased land holdings and businesses and correspondence and reports related to agriculture equipment and procedures. World War II-era materials document the opening of an “outpost office” and correspondence referring to agriculture quotas and contracts for the employment of individuals from the Tarboro Prisoner of War Camp (1943).

    • Box 6
       
      Business Correspondence, 1885
      Business Correspondence, 1886-1917
      Business Correspondence, January-September 1918
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1918
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1919
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1919
      Business Correspondence, August-September 1919
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1919
    • Box 7
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1920
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1920
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1920
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1920
      Business Correspondence, January 1921
      Business Correspondence, February 1921
      Business Correspondence, March 1921
    • Box 8
       
      Business Correspondence, April-May 1921
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1921
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1921
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1921
      Business Correspondence, January-December 1922
      Business Correspondence, January-December 1923
    • Box 9
       
      Business Correspondence, January-November 1924
      Business Correspondence, January-October 1925
      Business Correspondence, February-October 1926
      Business Correspondence, February-December 1927
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1928
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1928
      Business Correspondence, May-June 1928
    • Box 10
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1928
      Business Correspondence, October 1928
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1928
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1929
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1929
      Business Correspondence, May-July 1929
    • Box 11
       
      Business Correspondence, August-October 1929
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1929
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1929
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1930
      Business Correspondence, May-August 1930
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1930
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1930
    • Box 12
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1931
      Business Correspondence, April-May1931
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1931
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1931
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1931
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1932
      Business Correspondence, April-June1932
    • Box 13
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1932
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1932
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1933
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1933
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1933
      Business Correspondence, January-June 1934
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1934
    • Box 14
       
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1935
      Business Correspondence, March-May 1935
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1935
      Business Correspondence, September-December 1935
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1936
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1936
    • Box 15
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1936
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1936
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1937
      Business Correspondence, April-May 1937
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1937
    • Box 16
       
      Business Correspondence, September -December 1937
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1938
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1938
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1938
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1938
    • Box 17
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1939
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1939
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1939
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1939
      Business Correspondence, January- February 1940
      Business Correspondence, March-May 1940
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1940
    • Box 18
       
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1940
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1940
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1941
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1941
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1941
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1941
    • Box 19
       
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1942
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1942
      Business Correspondence, May-July 1942
      Business Correspondence, August-December 1942
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1943
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1943
      Business Correspondence, August-December 1943
      Business Correspondence, January-April 1944
    • Box 20
       
      Business Correspondence, May-September 1944
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1944
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1945
      Business Correspondence, April-September 1945
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1945
      Business Correspondence, January-June 1946
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1946
      Business Correspondence, February-November 1947
      Business Correspondence, 1948-1960
    • Box 21
       
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
  • Ephemera
     

    Included in the Ephemera series are early twentieth century catalogs related to agriculture and sporting goods. Also present are advertising ink pads featuring local businesses, state tax codes, WW II-related materials and Rand, Mcnally and Company maps of Mississippi, North Carolina and Missouri (circa 1900).

    • Box 40
       
      Ephemera consists of early twentieth century sales catalogs related to construction and farm implements, Certificates of War Necessity (1942), Rand, Mcnally and Company maps of Mississippi, North Carolina and Missouri (circa 1900), tuberculosis eradication certificates (1935), certificates of membership in Edgecombe-Martin Counties Electric Membership Corporation (1939), a Royster Almanac (1936), North Carolina sales tax regulations (1937) and a price list for handmade halters and bridles (undated).
      Early twentieth century catalogs related to construction, farm equipment, raising mules for profit and sporting goods. Of particular interest is a U.S. Department of Agriculture bulletin (1938) titled “Mule Production.” Also present are advertising ink pads featuring local businesses, a copy of the North Carolina Sale Tax Code (1937) and a bulletin from the Office of Defense Transportation, entitled “Instructions For Preparing Application For Certificate Of War Necessity (1942). Other material consists of clippings (1954, undated) about a yacht built for Edger E. (B.?) Younger and one of Younger and Mrs. Younger with a sailfish caught in Texas. Edger Younger is assumed to be a relative of A.L. Younger, part owner of Davis and Younger. Also included is a typescript poem (undated) , clippings during to WW II and related events in the Kansas City area, a few postcards of Arizona and Kansas, C.J. Winslow’s leather wallet and a blank monthly inspection card for E.C. Winslow’s Marmon 34 automobile. There are a few other references to E.C.’s Marmon automobile in other series. This is somewhat significant in the fact that, for its time, it was a fairly upscale and costly automobile. Also of importance is a “Book of Instructions and Repair Price List for the ‘New Way’ Vertical Oil Engine” (circa 1900) and colorfully illustrated catalog and price list for “Clipper Cleaners for Grain, Seeds and Beans” (1942). Circa 1900-1942, undated
  • Oversized Items
     

    Included in the Oversized Items are detailed instructions and drawings for construing agricultural structures, two Winslow Family genealogy charts, and several drawings of local and regional properties. Also present are early twentieth century-era posters advertising various events in Oklahoma and Eastern North Carolina and price lists of regional businesses. See Scope and Content Note for more details. 1832-1997, undated

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Container List

  • Business Correspondence
     

    Materials include livestock transport contracts, correspondence (1906) from the Office of the Quartermaster, 11th Calvary (Army) in Fort Des Moines, Iowa, a letter from Cross Press and Sign Company regarding advertising signs, financial materials related to leased land holdings and businesses and correspondence and reports related to agriculture equipment and procedures. World War II-era materials document the opening of an “outpost office” and correspondence referring to agriculture quotas and contracts for the employment of individuals from the Tarboro Prisoner of War Camp (1943).

    • Box 6
       
      Business Correspondence, 1885
      Business Correspondence, 1886-1917
      Business Correspondence, January-September 1918
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1918
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1919
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1919
      Business Correspondence, August-September 1919
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1919
    • Box 7
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1920
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1920
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1920
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1920
      Business Correspondence, January 1921
      Business Correspondence, February 1921
      Business Correspondence, March 1921
    • Box 8
       
      Business Correspondence, April-May 1921
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1921
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1921
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1921
      Business Correspondence, January-December 1922
      Business Correspondence, January-December 1923
    • Box 9
       
      Business Correspondence, January-November 1924
      Business Correspondence, January-October 1925
      Business Correspondence, February-October 1926
      Business Correspondence, February-December 1927
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1928
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1928
      Business Correspondence, May-June 1928
    • Box 10
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1928
      Business Correspondence, October 1928
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1928
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1929
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1929
      Business Correspondence, May-July 1929
    • Box 11
       
      Business Correspondence, August-October 1929
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1929
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1929
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1930
      Business Correspondence, May-August 1930
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1930
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1930
    • Box 12
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1931
      Business Correspondence, April-May1931
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1931
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1931
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1931
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1932
      Business Correspondence, April-June1932
    • Box 13
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1932
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1932
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1933
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1933
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1933
      Business Correspondence, January-June 1934
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1934
    • Box 14
       
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1935
      Business Correspondence, March-May 1935
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1935
      Business Correspondence, September-December 1935
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1936
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1936
    • Box 15
       
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1936
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1936
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1937
      Business Correspondence, April-May 1937
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1937
    • Box 16
       
      Business Correspondence, September -December 1937
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1938
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1938
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1938
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1938
    • Box 17
       
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1939
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1939
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1939
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1939
      Business Correspondence, January- February 1940
      Business Correspondence, March-May 1940
      Business Correspondence, June-August 1940
    • Box 18
       
      Business Correspondence, September-October 1940
      Business Correspondence, November-December 1940
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1941
      Business Correspondence, April-June 1941
      Business Correspondence, July-September 1941
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1941
    • Box 19
       
      Business Correspondence, January-February 1942
      Business Correspondence, March-April 1942
      Business Correspondence, May-July 1942
      Business Correspondence, August-December 1942
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1943
      Business Correspondence, April-July 1943
      Business Correspondence, August-December 1943
      Business Correspondence, January-April 1944
    • Box 20
       
      Business Correspondence, May-September 1944
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1944
      Business Correspondence, January-March 1945
      Business Correspondence, April-September 1945
      Business Correspondence, October-December 1945
      Business Correspondence, January-June 1946
      Business Correspondence, July-December 1946
      Business Correspondence, February-November 1947
      Business Correspondence, 1948-1960
    • Box 21
       
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
      Business Correspondence, undated
  • Ephemera
     

    Included in the Ephemera series are early twentieth century catalogs related to agriculture and sporting goods. Also present are advertising ink pads featuring local businesses, state tax codes, WW II-related materials and Rand, Mcnally and Company maps of Mississippi, North Carolina and Missouri (circa 1900).

    • Box 40
       
      Ephemera consists of early twentieth century sales catalogs related to construction and farm implements, Certificates of War Necessity (1942), Rand, Mcnally and Company maps of Mississippi, North Carolina and Missouri (circa 1900), tuberculosis eradication certificates (1935), certificates of membership in Edgecombe-Martin Counties Electric Membership Corporation (1939), a Royster Almanac (1936), North Carolina sales tax regulations (1937) and a price list for handmade halters and bridles (undated).
      Early twentieth century catalogs related to construction, farm equipment, raising mules for profit and sporting goods. Of particular interest is a U.S. Department of Agriculture bulletin (1938) titled “Mule Production.” Also present are advertising ink pads featuring local businesses, a copy of the North Carolina Sale Tax Code (1937) and a bulletin from the Office of Defense Transportation, entitled “Instructions For Preparing Application For Certificate Of War Necessity (1942). Other material consists of clippings (1954, undated) about a yacht built for Edger E. (B.?) Younger and one of Younger and Mrs. Younger with a sailfish caught in Texas. Edger Younger is assumed to be a relative of A.L. Younger, part owner of Davis and Younger. Also included is a typescript poem (undated) , clippings during to WW II and related events in the Kansas City area, a few postcards of Arizona and Kansas, C.J. Winslow’s leather wallet and a blank monthly inspection card for E.C. Winslow’s Marmon 34 automobile. There are a few other references to E.C.’s Marmon automobile in other series. This is somewhat significant in the fact that, for its time, it was a fairly upscale and costly automobile. Also of importance is a “Book of Instructions and Repair Price List for the ‘New Way’ Vertical Oil Engine” (circa 1900) and colorfully illustrated catalog and price list for “Clipper Cleaners for Grain, Seeds and Beans” (1942). Circa 1900-1942, undated
  • Oversized Items
     

    Included in the Oversized Items are detailed instructions and drawings for construing agricultural structures, two Winslow Family genealogy charts, and several drawings of local and regional properties. Also present are early twentieth century-era posters advertising various events in Oklahoma and Eastern North Carolina and price lists of regional businesses. See Scope and Content Note for more details. 1832-1997, undated


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