Alex L. Manly Papers, 1898-1984

Manuscript Collection #65

  • Descriptive Summary
     
    Title: Alex L. Manly Papers
    Creator: Manly, Alex
    Manly, Caroline Sadgwar
    Repository: ECU Manuscript Collection
    Language: English
    Abstract: Papers (1898-1899, undated) including photographs, clippings, biographical sketch, and photocopy of pages from A Documentary History of The Negro People in the United States concerning Alex L. Manly, African-American newspaper editor of The Record in Wilmington, North Carolina, during the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898. Additional materials Include typed transcriptions of nine letters (November 19, 1953-November 9, 1955) written by Caroline “Carrie” Sadgwar Manly (widow of Alex L. Manly) to her sons Milo A. Manly and Lewin Manly. The transcriptions were done by Milo A. Manly (1903-1991) and given by him to the donor, Professor Charles Hardy III. Also included is a photocopy of the transcription of an interview done with Milo A. Manly by the donor on September 11, 1984. The original interview is held at Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky.
    Extent: 0.13 Cubic feet, 1 archival box, 16 items, photographs, clippings, sketch, correspondence, transcription.
  • Description
     

    Included in the collection are photographs of The Record staff and building, Alex L. Manly and his brother before fleeing from Wilmington, and later pictures of Manly and his family. Of particular interest is a clipping from the New York Herald for November 14, 1898, giving an account of the Wilmington race riot, and a photocopy of pages from A Documentary History of The Negro People in the United States (Herbert Aptheker, editor) quoting Alex L. Manly's famous 1898 editorial in The Record. Along with the editorial is an 1899 speech by a Reverend Morris, entitled "The Wilmington Massacre, 1898," which recounts the details of that encounter.

  • Biographical / Historical Note
     

    Alexander L. Manly was a Negro leader and newspaper editor in Wilmington, N.C., during the 1890s. As editor of The Record, he was accused of stirring racial discord through his outspoken editorial policy. In 1898 Manly and his family were forced to flee the city on the eve of the famous Wilmington race riot. The Manlys resettled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

  • Administrative Information
     
    Accessions Information

    November 5, 1968, 6 items; Photographs, clippings, and biographical sketch. Gift of Mr. Milo M. Manly, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

    April 20, 2015, (unprocessed addition 1), 0.057 cu. ft., 10 items; Included in this addition are typed transcriptions of nine letters (November 19, 1953-November 9, 1955) written by Caroline “Carrie” Sadgwar Manly (widow of Alex L. Manly) living in La Mott (near Philadelphia), PA, to her sons Milo A. Manly and Lewin Manly. The transcriptions were done by Milo A. Manly (1903-1991) and given by him to the donor, Professor Charles Hardy III. Also included is a photocopy of the transcription (done by Jennie Boyd) of an interview done with Milo A. Manly by Professor Charles Hardy III on September 11, 1984. Donated by Charles Hardy III.

    Acquisition Information

    Gift of Milo M. Manly Gift of Charles Hardy III

    Access Restrictions

    No restrictions

    Copyright Notice

    Literary rights to specific documents are retained by the authors or their descendants in accordance with U.S. copyright law. The donor, Professor Charles Hardy III, of the Caroline Manly correspondence transcriptions reserves the right to use them in his own publications.

    Preferred Citation

    Alex L. Manly Papers (#65), East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J. Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.

    Processing Information

    Processed by D. Lennon

    Encoded by Apex Data Services

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