Alex L. Manly Papers

1898-1899, 1953-1984
Manuscript Collection #65
Creator(s)
Manly, Caroline Sadgwar; Manly, Alex
Physical description
0.13 Cubic Feet, 1 archival box, 16 items, photographs, clippings, sketch, correspondence, transcription.
Preferred Citation
Alex L. Manly Papers (#65), East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J. Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.
Repository
ECU Manuscript Collection
Access
No restrictions

Papers (1898-1899, undated) including photographs, clippings, biographical sketch, and photocopy of pages from A Documentary History of The Negro People in the United States concerning Alex L. Manly (1866-1944), African-American newspaper editor of The Record in Wilmington, North Carolina, during the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898. Additional materials Include typed transcriptions of nine letters (November 19, 1953-November 9, 1955) written by Caroline "Carrie" Sadgwar Manly (widow of Alex L. Manly) to her sons Milo A. Manly and Lewin Manly. The transcriptions were done by Milo A. Manly (1903-1991) and given by him to the donor, Professor Charles Hardy III. Also included is a photocopy of the transcription of an interview done with Milo A. Manly by the donor on September 11, 1984. The original interview is held at Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky.


Biographical/historical information

Alexander L. Manly (1866-1944) was a African American leader and newspaper editor in Wilmington, N.C., during the 1890s. As editor of The Record, he was accused of stirring racial discord through his outspoken editorial policy. In 1898 Manly and his family were forced to flee the city on the eve of the famous Wilmington race riot. The Manlys resettled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Caroline "Carrie" Sadgwar Manly, wife of Alex Manely, grew up in Wilmington NC. She attended Fisk University in Nashville TN, where she trained as a vocalist. She was in London, England performing during the time of the Wilmington Riot. After moving to Philadelphia

Milo Manly (1903-1991) was one of two sons of Alex and Caroline Manly. Milo was raised in Philadelphia and attended Cheltenham High School. Like his father, Milo became a civil rights and political activist in Philadelphia. Milo became the director of fieldwork for the National Council for Permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission.

https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/manly-alex

https://goinnorth.org/milo-manly-interview


Scope and arrangement

Included in the collection are photographs of The Record staff and building, Alex L. Manly and his brother before fleeing from Wilmington, and later pictures of Manly and his family. Of particular interest is a clipping from the New York Herald for November 14, 1898, giving an account of the Wilmington race riot, and a photocopy of pages from A Documentary History of The Negro People in the United States (Herbert Aptheker, editor) quoting Alex L. Manly's famous 1898 editorial in The Record. Along with the editorial is an 1899 speech by a Reverend Morris, entitled "The Wilmington Massacre, 1898," which recounts the details of that encounter.

Included in this addition are typed transcriptions of nine letters (Nov 19, 1953- Nov 9, 1955) written by Caroline "Carrie" Sadgwar Manly (widow of Alex L. Manly) living in La Mott (near Philadelphia), Pa, to her sons Milo A. Manly (1903-1991) and Lewin Manly. The transcriptions were done by Milo A. Manly (1903-1991). The letters cover a range of topics related to Caroline Manly. She discusses her grandfather, David Elias Sadgwar, who owned farmland and city properties, and her grandmother, (Julia) who was a slave. She details her father's life as a slave and subsequent education after the abolition of slavery. Caroline's other grandfather Bender (Grampa Jim) was a part of the Cherokee Tribe. Caroline then details her life growing up in Wilmington, NC, and her time at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. She discusses her future husband's (Alex Manly) role and escape during the Wilmington Race Riot (North Carolina) of 1898. After the riot, she moved to Philadelphia and then to La Mott, Pa.

Also included is a photocopy of the transcription (done by Jennie Boyd) of an interview done with Milo A. Manly by Professor Charles Hardy III on Sept 11, 1984. Milo discusses his early life growing up. During WWI he dropped out of Cheltenham High School (Wyncote, PA) to work at a machine shop. After the Armistice was signed ending WWI, Manly describes the racial tensions in Philadelphia, driven in part due to the lack of jobs in the area. Milo retuned to high school, graduated, and then attended the University of Pennsylvania for mechanical engineering. Milo was then director of fieldwork for the National Council for Permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission. Milo discusses his father's role in the Armstrong Association and political activism in the Philadelphia region.


Administrative information
Custodial History

November 5, 1968, 6 items; Photographs, clippings, and biographical sketch. Gift of Mr. Milo M. Manly, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

April 20, 2015, (unprocessed addition 1), 0.057 cu. ft., 10 items; Included in this addition are typed transcriptions of nine letters (November 19, 1953-November 9, 1955) written by Caroline "Carrie" Sadgwar Manly (widow of Alex L. Manly) living in La Mott (near Philadelphia), PA, to her sons Milo A. Manly and Lewin Manly. The transcriptions were done by Milo A. Manly (1903-1991) and given by him to the donor, Professor Charles Hardy III. Also included is a photocopy of the transcription (done by Jennie Boyd) of an interview done with Milo A. Manly by Professor Charles Hardy III on September 11, 1984. Donated by Charles Hardy III.

Source of acquisition

Gift of Milo M. Manly Gift of Charles Hardy III

Processing information

Processed by D. Lennon

Encoded by Apex Data Services

Copyright notice

Literary rights to specific documents are retained by the authors or their descendants in accordance with U.S. copyright law. The donor, Professor Charles Hardy III, of the Caroline Manly correspondence transcriptions reserves the right to use them in his own publications.


Key terms
Personal Names
Manly, Alex
Topical
African American newspapers--History
African Americans--North Carolina-- Wilmington--History--19th century
Riots--North Carolina--Wilmington--History--19th century
Places
Wilmington (N.C.)--History--19th century
Wilmington (N.C.)--Race relations--History