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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 75 Issue 8, Sept/Oct 2011
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Record #:
15306
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission began its Delayed Harvest Program twenty years ago. The program currently covers twenty-one streams and one lake. Regulations require that all fishermen release the trout they catch between October first and the first Saturday in June. They must fish with a single hook artificial lure or fly. Beginning in June, fishermen are allowed to keep seven trout a day. Dean discusses other requirements of the program which is one of the Wildlife Commission's most popular.
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Record #:
15308
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Angelo De Paola has been catching king mackerel off the Jolly Roger Pier on Topsail Island for the past fifty-six years. While he has landed a number of different species from the pier, king mackerel seems to be his specialty with an impressive number of 512 caught as of June 2011. In November 2010 he passed another milestone - his ninetieth birthday. He draws on his half century of experience to give advice and help to beginning anglers in their quest for the king mackerel.
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Record #:
15307
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Wind is the second-largest source of renewable energy in the nation. In May 2011 the North Carolina Utilities Commission approved the Desert Wind Energy Project. If approved by other agencies (state, local, and federal) 150, 400-foot tall wind turbines will go up near Elizabeth City. This will produce enough electricity for up to 70,000 homes. Manuel discusses how this project could impact wildlife.
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Record #:
15309
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Gopher frogs were once common in the lower Coastal Plain and the Sandhills, but loss of habitat has reduced their number. Using one of the few remaining wild populations, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher are partnering to raise gopher frogs for restoration.
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