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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 71 Issue 2, Feb 2007
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Record #:
8517
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The robust redhorse is a unique member of a family of fishes known as suckers. This fish had not been seen in the state's waterways for over 120 years until one was caught in the Pee Dee River in 1985, near Rockingham. Fifteen years would pass before another redhorse was captured in 2000. Pusser describes a survey of the Pee Dee River south of Richmond County to the South Carolina state line. The purpose was to locate other redhorses and to gain some insight about the their population and range. Pusser relates what was discovered.
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Record #:
8513
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The Appalachian elktoe mussel was placed on the endangered species list in 1994. Between 2004 and 2006, North Carolina Wildlife Commission biologists studied this mussel on the Little Tennessee River between the town of Franklin and the Fontana Reservoir and reported a decline in its population. There is no obvious reason for the decline, and biologists are not ruling out disease, parasites, or toxins. Part of the decline is attributed to flooding from tropical storms Frances and Ivan. Even more puzzling is that five other mussel species in the same area at the same time have stable populations.
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Record #:
8514
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John E. Pechmann, who was chairman of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission from 1999 to 2006, is remembered by his colleagues and friends. Pechmann died of a heart attack on July 15, 2006. Governor Mike Easley said Pechmann “was a dedicated public servant, a strong conservationist, and an advocate for all sportsmen. Under his leadership, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission made the state a better place to enjoy fishing, hunting and recreation.” During his tenure as chairman, the commission's land acquisitions doubled to reach two million acres of managed game lands across North Carolina.
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Record #:
8515
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Almy discusses shed hunting. Sheds are the antlers that a deer loses, usually in mid- to late January. Another set of antlers will be grown by the fall. Hunting sheds give hunters an idea of where deer travel on game lands and the age of the deer. Shed hunting has become so popular that guided, weeklong shed hunts in prime deer areas, including food and lodging included, can cost as much as $3,000. Fortunately, it is free on game lands and the hunter's own hunting area.
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Record #:
8516
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The Taylor family of Vance County--Ed, Bill, and Dungee--have been hunting rabbits in the northern Piedmont for decades. The ingredients for a good hunt are few--hunters, dogs, guns, and good cover filled with rabbits. In this interview, the Taylors discuss their years of hunting rabbits and what they have learned.
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