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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 70 Issue 7, July 2006
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Record #:
7969
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Casada profiles of some noted North Carolina fly fishermen who have helped create, nurture and preserve the fly-fishing traditions of the western section of the state. Mark Cathey, who died in 1944, is considered the best-known of all the state's fly-fishermen. Others who played a role in the rich heritage of fly fishing include Levi Haynes, Allene Hall, Dwight Howell, Marty Maxwell, and Bennie Joe Craig. Casada provides a baker's dozen of traditional mountain fly patterns, all of them tried-and-true flies developed in the mountains by locals.
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Record #:
7964
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is acquiring over 65,000 acres of land from the International Paper Corp. The land consists mostly of bottomland forests, floodplains, and wetlands, making them valuable for water quality protection. Several tracts contain rare and endangered plants and animals. Most of the land lies in the northeastern and southeastern sections of the state.
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Record #:
7968
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River cane is found in Southeastern states. Cherokee Indians used it for food, building houses, and making baskets. River cane became rare in the state's western counties by the late 19th-century. Nationwide, river cane today is reduced to about three percent of its natural extent. In the 21st-century a number of groups interested in preserving natural resources are restoring cane.
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Record #:
7963
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Panfish include bluegills, pumpkinseeds, and redbreast sunfish. Almy discusses fishing for them with seven fishing lures--grubs, spinnerbaits, spinners, crankbaits, Carolina-rigged plastics, soft-plastic insect imitations, and spoons.
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