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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 70 Issue 6, June 2006
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Record #:
7901
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In 1990, twenty-five public fishing piers, approximately one-fourth of all the fishing piers on the Atlantic Coast, jutted out from the state's coastline from Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach. Kure Beach Pier, which open in 1923, was the first, and it has remained in the Kure family's possession for the past eighty-three years. By May 1, 2006, ten of the twenty-five had closed forever. Hurricanes caused the loss of some piers, but accelerated development on the barrier islands, especially Bogue Banks, is the main reason for closing piers. The price of beachfront property is soaring, and pier owners are selling to the developers. Soon the state's fishing piers and the culture they engendered will be gone forever.
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Record #:
7881
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In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund was the brainchild of State Senator Marc Basnight. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers. Not only has the fund protected water resources, it has facilitated significant increases in state game lands and other areas designated for outdoor recreation. One of the largest fund recipients has been the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, which has received almost $77 million for forty-nine projects statewide. The fund is helping the state reach its goal of preserving one million acres of additional open space (the One Million Acre Initiative) by the year 2009.
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Record #:
7880
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The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores has been closed to the public for nearly three years during its $25 million expansion. The aquarium reopened on May 19, 2006. In comparing the old and new structures, the largest display increased from 12,000 gallons to 306,000, square footage from 29,000 to 93,000, and the full-time staff from fourteen people to forty-five people. The aquarium has broadened its focus, and the new theme is “North Carolina's aquatic life from the mountains to the sea.” Five galleries showcase the state's major aquatic zones. The attendance is projected to double from 250,000 to half a million.
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Record #:
7900
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Abstract:
Ticks are common parasites that are found all across the state. There are around 800 to 900 species of ticks in the world, but only a few live in North Carolina. The American dog tick is the state's largest in size. The black-legged tick and lone star tick are also found here. They are health threats that can cause skin irritations and diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and lyme disease. Sorenson suggests ways of dealing with ticks during the summer season, such as recognizing a tick habitat and dressing for tick when outside.
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