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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 9, Sept 2005
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Record #:
7406
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Hiker and author Allen de Hart of Louisburg is profiled. A history professor emeritus at Louisburg College, de Hart has charted hundreds of routes across North Carolina and several other southern states in eight hiking guidebooks. He is a trail promoter, designer, and builder. He has served on the North Carolina Trails Commission for sixteen years and as project director of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.
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Record #:
7408
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With the decline of tobacco and other crops, North Carolina farmers seek alternative sources of revenue to hold on to their family farms. The Fowler family, who have owned their 600-acre farm for three generations, chose sporting clays. Their business is called Fowler Sporting Clays and Game Preserve of Madison County. Sporting clays is the fastest growing shotgun sport in the nation and differs from traditional clay target games in the level of difficulty and the natural terrain. Schmitt describes the Fowler's gun range and the sport which originated in England almost 100 years ago.
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7407
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Twelve doves is the day limit for dove hunters. Attracting a good number of the birds to a field so hunters can bag their limit requires preparation in advance. Hester discusses this advance planning with hunters and farmers in Rowan, Wake, and Johnston Counties, and two North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission biologists. Among the methods are careful planting and management of crops that are attractive to doves.
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Record #:
7410
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Because of a black spot directly behind its gills, the spot, or Leiostomus xanthurus, is one of the easiest ocean fishes to identify. The spot is a plentiful fish. Over four million spot were caught in 2004 by recreational anglers. In 1933, THE STATE magazine reported a commercial catch of 200,000 pounds in a single net. Morris describes how the spot provided food for many farm families through the winter.
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Record #:
7409
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Through the work of taxidermists, an outdoorsman's fondest hunting or fishing memories can be preserved for a lifetime. Beane discusses what should be done with a future trophy animal or fish before the taxidermist begins work on it and what should be done to keep it in good shape after the taxidermist's work is finished.
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