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8 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 5, May 2004
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6654
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In the state's coastal waters, the red drum has been under a recovery plan conducted by the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries since 1997, when the stock was declared overfished. By 2003, the red drum stock was recovering. Information from anglers indicated more fish caught in the 32- to 40-inch range and record sizes in the state Salt Water Fishing Tournament for release of trophy-sized fish. The red drum is important in North Carolina tournament fishing. In 2003, the state held sixteen out of a possible twenty International Game Fish Association line-test marks.
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6658
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More than 60 species of freshwater mussels live in North Carolina; over half are listed by the state as endangered, threatened, or deserving special attention. Durham's plan for the Flat River could endanger several rare species, including the yellow lamp mussel, if Lake Michie is expanded to meet growing drinking water demands. The article discusses the plan, which would cause most Flat River mussels to die within a year because of a lack of moving water.
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6655
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The wild turkey has made a remarkable recovery in North Carolina. From a low of 2,000 in 1970, wild turkeys are now found in all one hundred of the state's counties. Many individuals and groups have played a part in this conservation success story. However, one person deserves special credit for the turkey's comeback. That person is Wayne Bailey, who was the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's lead turkey biologist during the critical decade of the 1970s. Bailey is profiled in this Casada article.
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Record #:
6661
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Mike Bryant, refuge manager for Alligator River and Pea Island National Wildlife Refuges in eastern North Carolina, has been selected by the National Wildlife Refuge Association and the National Wildlife and Fish Foundation as the 2004 winner of the Paul Krogel Award for Refuge Manager of the Year. The award recognizes outstanding accomplishment in the protection and management of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
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Record #:
6660
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Eugene Price, a commissioner for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, was recently named the Governor's Conservation Achievement Awards Sportsman of the Year for 2003. A Goldsboro resident, Price is editor emeritus for the Goldsboro NEWS-ARGUS, where he writes more than 250 articles a year about conservation issues.
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6657
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The North Carolina's varied climates and habitats are conducive to the growth of orchids. Over fifty species grow wild in the state. Many are small, rare and hard to find. Wallace describes a number of them, including green adder's mouth, dragon's mouth, green-fly, and nodding ladies' tresses.
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6656
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North Carolina has extensive coastal estuaries and wetland habitats. Because of this, an impressive array of herons, bitterns, and ibises make their homes there. Lee discusses nesting habits, characteristic feeding behaviors, and seasonal occurrences of these birds.
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Record #:
6659
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Hickory shad have made a comeback over the last decade in the Roanoke River. Favorable spring spawning and ocean conditions, as well as commercial fishing limits and harvest restrictions are contributing factors.
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