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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 10, Oct 2004
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Record #:
6881
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Powell discusses black bear hunting in eastern North Carolina. Conservation has raised the bear population to an all-time high, with 7,000 bears in the East and around 4,000 in the West. Eastern bears are able to forage in farming areas, and this ready food supply creates large animals in the 500 to 600 pound range. The largest black bear taken weighed 880 pounds. The bear has now replaced the deer as North Carolina's big game animal.
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Record #:
6882
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European colonists who settled on North Carolina's Coastal Plain quickly learned to use the wild vegetables, berries, fruits, and nuts they found growing there. Nuts provided food for their tables and for their hogs. The tradition of nutting continues to this day. Casada discusses the practice and where to find nuts, including black walnut, hazelnut, butternuts, and beechnuts.
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Record #:
6890
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The 2004 North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue had been debated for over a decade. Fishermen will not be required to have the license until January 1, 2006. Then residents and nonresidents who fish from the shore or a boat in the state's marine waters will be required to purchase the $15 license annually. Vacationers may purchase a seven-day license for $1.
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Record #:
6889
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Governor Michael Easley grew up on a Nash County tobacco farm in the 1950s and 1960s, where hunting and fishing was a family tradition. In this interview, Easley, who entered office in 2001, discusses how his sporting background helps to shape his thinking on conservation of the state's natural resources and public lands.
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