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9 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 59 Issue 3, Mar 1995
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Record #:
2204
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Most common in the Coastal Plain, headwater forests develop at the beginning of creeks and streams and are the most numerous of the state's wetlands. While not diverse biologically, they have the greatest effect on water quality of all the wetlands.
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Record #:
2203
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Generally, a freshwater marsh is a temporary wetland, existing until filled by sediment washing downstream. During its lifetime, the marsh provides food and shelter for plants and animals and also stores excess water when floods occur.
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Record #:
2201
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Pocosins, vast, densely vegetated areas, and savannas, grassy flat areas, exist only in the state's Coastal Plain. Savannas are important because of their diverse plant and animal life, while pocosins absorb excess rainwater.
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Record #:
2202
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Seasonal wetlands are small areas that are wet only for a short period during the year. Some of the smallest of the state's wetlands, seasonal wetlands can be as little as two meters in diameter.
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Record #:
2205
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Most of the state's bottomland hardwood forests are found in the Coastal Plain along broad river flood plains. Because the forest exists in a flooding environment, the plants and animals there must adapt to the fluctuating water levels or perish.
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Record #:
2207
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As the state's economy has grown, upwards of 50 percent of its wetlands have been lost. This statistic is questionable, however, because of a lack of data on the original extent of wetlands and disagreement over when a wetland is actually lost.
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Record #:
2209
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Considered useless wastelands since the founding of the U.S., wetlands are now being recognized for their critical environmental roles, including flood control and game fish propagation. Without wetlands, a number of species of wildlife would disappear.
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Record #:
2206
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Some wetlands, such as swamps and marshes, are easily identifiable. Others, though, are dry several months each year. Wet or dry, both must meet three criteria to be classified as a wetland: wetland vegetation, hydric (wet) soil, and water evidence.
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Record #:
2210
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Abstract:
Although usually less than five acres in size, mountain bogs have important environmental functions: helping to control flooding, filtering water supplies of pollutants, and providing plant and animal habitats
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