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3 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 49 Issue 12, Dec 1985
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Record #:
9807
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Before the 1970s, quail were abundant in the Southeast, but the population has rapidly declined since then. A major study seeks to answer why this has happened. Changing land use, predation, natural fluctuations, and control by man of naturally occurring fires are seen as contributing factors in the decline.
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Record #:
9806
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Ravens are members of the crow family and are the largest of all passerines, or perching birds. They are considered one of the most intelligent and mischievous of birds. Almost extinct along the East Coast at the start of the 20th-century, the bird has made a comeback. In North Carolina, ravens live at altitudes above 3,000 feet.
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Record #:
9808
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The fall line is an East Coast geological feature that marks the boundary between the Piedmont and the coastal plain. A true fall line prevented navigation upstream. Earley seeks to answer the questions of what a fall line in North Carolina is exactly and where it is.
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