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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 45 Issue 9, Sept 1981
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Record #:
6042
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When publishing magnate and sportsman Joseph P. Knapp first came to Currituck in 1916, he began a love affair with the region. Earley describes how Knapp's love of hunting evolved into a need to conserve waterfowl. He helped form an organization which eventually became Ducks Unlimited, a leading conservation group. Since its founding in 1937, Ducks Unlimited has raised $134 million for waterfowl conservation. Almost $100 million has gone directly to wetland development.
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Record #:
6055
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Frank Stick lived the last 37 years of his life on the Outer Banks. He is regarded as one of the country's best artists ever to paint outdoor subjects. His book AN ARTIST'S CATCH contains 285 paintings of fresh and saltwater fish. He was a founder of the Izzak Walton League, a promoter of responsible land development on the Outer Banks, and a land donor for the Wright Memorial. But he is practically unknown in his adopted state.
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Record #:
6054
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North Carolina is home to three species of tree squirrels. The gray squirrel is the most abundant and familiar of trio. The red squirrel is common only in the mountains. The elusive fox squirrel, the largest of the group, is found mostly in the southeastern pine forests.
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Record #:
9682
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Warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina. They are among the hardest birds to find and to identify because they are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs.
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