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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 40 Issue 4, Apr 1976
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Record #:
9368
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Abstract:
Within a half a mile to two miles off the North Carolina coastline lie areas containing many varieties of sponges, fish, and other interesting forms of marine life. There is a movement underway to preserve these unique areas for future generations through the creation of designated natural areas. State designation means the area is permanently managed and protected and that no incompatible use would occur there. Three possible areas have been selected near New River and offshore Topsail Island and Masonboro Inlet.
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Record #:
9366
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Botanical Garden in Chapel Hill is celebrating its tenth anniversary with the opening of its first permanent building, the Totten Garden Center. The Center was built through a generous contribution from Dr. Henry Roland Totten and Addie Williams Totten. Ferguson describes the garden, which is a 330-acre tract of natural forests, open fields, and streams located about a mile from the University of North Carolina.
Record #:
9367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Isopods are animals with seven pairs of legs, have a body divided into three parts, and display a variety of shapes and colors. One can roll-up into a complete ball when disturbed. They are not insects, but belong to a group of animals called Crustacea. Over a dozen species reside in North Carolina. Shelley describes several of them.
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Record #:
9365
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Abstract:
The yellow perch, also known as the raccoon fish or ringed perch, can reach a size of almost twelve inches and weigh about a pound. Cornell discusses the perch's coloration, habitat, life history, and importance as a game fish.
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