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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for We the People of North Carolina Vol. 19 Issue 11, April 1962
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Record #:
31062
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tar Heel economy took a $207 million whack from traffic accidents last year. The immense dollar loss came from highway deaths, injuries, hospital and funeral expenses, loss of income, property damage, and lawsuits. The year's traffic toll included 1,254 fatalities, and over 34,000 injuries, with 60,000 mishaps reported. Only four of the 100 counties in the state escaped without a fatality from traffic accidents.
Record #:
31067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the North Carolina State College are shedding light on an important mystery of the tobacco plant--the source of its smell. Related to the tobacco gums secreted by the leaf hairs, tobacco's aroma can be studied using the chemistry of the trichomes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31066
Author(s):
Abstract:
In comparing net sales and use tax collections for 1961-1962 with the fiscal year 1960-1961, there is a $22,364,623, or 25% increase. The total amount collection reached $111,685,585, with the largest amounts collected from Mecklenburg, Forsythe, Guilford, and Wake counties.
Record #:
31068
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nine-point, all practice method of growing tobacco has boosted per-acre income from less than $1000 to $2000 for farmers in Apex, North Carolina. The all practice system includes soil testing, top-soiling, rotation, use of drainage tile, proper use of terraces and/or strip cropping, subsoiling, careful selection of fertilizers, use of well-adapted varieties, and fumigation of nematode-infested soil.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although almost unknown before 1945, particle board production has become a shining start of the North Carolina wood products industry. With wide uses, North Carolina alone has 13 particle board plants, and sales are worth more than $1.4 million a year, outpaced only by Oregon.