NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 252, Aug 1988
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34080
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey, the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, and local governments in North Carolina’s Coastal Plain area are cooperating on a study of the hydrology and groundwater resource potential of the Castle Hayne Aquifer in Eastern North Carolina. The study will produce a series of hydrogeologic maps that will be useful in planning and constructing water wells and test holes.
Record #:
34079
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are approximately 222,000 underground storage tanks in North Carolina, thirty-six-percent of which are at risk of failing and leaking their contents into the surrounding earth, threatening to contaminate groundwater. Cleanup of some major pollution incidents may be paid for by a federal trust fund established through Superfund legislation.
Record #:
34077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater protection in North Carolina, which primarily the responsibility of the Groundwater Section of the Division of Environmental Management, has been strengthened considerably over the past several years by many research and assessment efforts and by regulatory developments. The groundwater protection program aims to prevent pollution by facilities that generate or treat waste, restore polluted groundwater, and plan for the wise use and development of groundwater resources.
Record #:
34078
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s dispersed population pattern makes groundwater particularly important as a water supply for those who live far from city water systems. The Coastal Plain has several major aquifers which provide large and predictable supplies of quality groundwater. In the Piedmont and Mountain regions, the availability of groundwater is generally more limited and is highly variable.
Record #:
34081
Author(s):
Abstract:
Record high temperatures and drought conditions have created emergency conditions for both the agricultural community and water utilities in North Carolina. After record amounts of water being used, water utilities are beginning to implement voluntary or mandatory water restrictions.