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4 results for Upland Gazette Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spr 2013
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Record #:
20861
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Abstract:
At one time Bachman's sparrow ranged as far north as Pennsylvania and as far west as Illinois. Now it has disappeared from the Midwest and its northern range ends in North Carolina. It is listed as Special Concern in the state and may make the federal endangered species list if the decline continues. Marcus discusses reasons for the decline. It is the one bird in the state that is most dependent on prescribed burning on public and private lands.
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Record #:
20864
Abstract:
Prescribed burning, or the controlled burning of woodlands, helps restore the ecosystem by reducing the chances of wildfires, improving food growth for animals and birds, and controlling parasites. Despite the benefits to wildlife, the question arises whether it is desirable or disastrous to burn during the wild turkey nesting season. The authors report on a study of nesting-season controlled burns conducted on 100,000 acres at Fort Bragg. Information is provided on how the impact of the fire was determined, the results, and fire recommendations for turkey management.
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Record #:
20863
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Nightly sounds of the Eastern Whip-poor-will have not been as common as they once were, and the reason for the decline is not clear. The bird is poorly documented by traditional long-term monitoring methods. Biologists lack basic information about the current distribution, relative abundance, and population trends. Kelly discusses ways the state is now collecting data and how land management can assist in maintaining the bird.
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Record #:
20862
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Abstract:
The NC Wildlife Resources Commission conducted a survey in 2012 to obtain demographic data and opinions on management and hunting seasons from dove and woodcock hunters. Six thousand dove hunters were surveyed with results from 3,500. Twenty-nine hundred woodcock hunters were surveyed with results from 1,400.
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