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6 results for The State Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987
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Record #:
7847
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In 1968, North Carolina opened its first welcome center on Interstate 85. By 1986, there were eight welcome centers on the major highways that were visited by fifty million tourists each day. The Travel and Tourism Division of the state was aware that tourism was ranked the third largest industry. The division boasted that the welcome centers made tourists feel comfortable while they were educated about the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p8-9,31, il
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Record #:
7854
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From 1875 to 1906, the town of Graham, North Carolina, was known for selling corn whiskey made by locals. Saloons stayed open until 10 or 10:30 p.m. on weekdays and 11 p.m. on Saturdays. But by 1906, the prohibition era had started and practically all of the saloons were closed. In 1908, North Carolina approved prohibition, and bootlegging took over the market that had previously been operated by businessmen. Even after prohibition was lifted in 1933, the influence of Miss Carry Nation, a prohibitionist, still lingered, and liquor by the drink was never popular again in the area.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
7848
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When Charles Salter's cow and calf went missing on Bogue Banks, North Carolina in 1917, Salter suspected wrongdoing. John Wheeler Glover was known for his intolerance of animals roaming on his land. When Salter confronted him, an argument ensued. Both men pulled their guns and killed each other simultaneously. Because there were no witnesses, the shootout has left many questions unanswered. We will never know if Glover killed Salter's animals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p15,31, il
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Record #:
7855
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Edenton has historical homes and gardens along the waterfront and memories of the pirate Blackbeard. The Edenton Carriage Company helps preserve this history by giving visitors the option of traveling through the area in a horse-drawn carriage. The tours, which started in 1985, take between twenty and twenty-five minutes while the guide gives historical information about the town.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p22-24, il
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Record #:
7860
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The schooner PRIDE OF BALTIMORE sank in 1985, and the Pusaski, in 1838. The two disasters have something in common: Each disaster united a couple who became stranded at sea. The couples vowed to wed if they survived. Sun-burned, starved, and exhausted, both couples were indeed rescued and later wed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p20-21, il
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Record #:
7868
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Stephan Williams, of Duplin County, followed the news of the construction of the Washington Monument from home. And he was able to travel to Washington, D.C. to see the tip of the pyramidon placed on the top. Years later, Williams was working in Washington, D.C. when he was given the three-hundred-pound ox-cart, five-hundred-pound hubs, and an axel which were used in the construction of the monument. In 1983, his daughter, Serence Williams Smith, donated these items to the Cowan Museum in Kenansville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Mar 1987, p10,31, il
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