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10 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985
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Record #:
8271
Abstract:
Casstevens discusses the life of Thomas L. Clingman, a historical figure he encountered while working on a thesis. During the Civil War, Clingman became associated with the “Clingman Raid.” It was rumored at the time Clingman led into Illinois a group of thieves that supposedly stole horses and terrorized local communities. Casstevens argues that Clingman probably had nothing to do with this raid because he was never caught or officially proven to have been in Illinois. The author also demonstrates how Republican leaders might have created the hoax to increase their support in the 1864 election. Included in the article is a brief biography of Clingman who was a North Carolina antebellum statesman born in Surry County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p11-12, il
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Record #:
8272
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During the World War II military buildup, Fort Bragg faced a big problem. On the base stood a massive balloon hangar built during World War I. Needing space to expand, military officials wanted the building torn down. The building's sturdy construction and heavy timbers, however, ensured that completing the job would be no easy task. In 1941 a solution naturally occurred as the building burned down. Firefighters were quick on the scene, but they allowed the building to burn while ensuring onlooker's safety. The cause of the fire was found to be old wiring.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p13-14, por
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Record #:
8273
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On his way to Los Angeles, Walt Disney spent a few short months, in 1924, working in Asheville. The 23-year-old Disney worked as a draftsman for Thomas A. Cox., Jr.'s engineering firm. Disney, however, did not find success in this trade, as he tended to include ornate drawings such, as tiny hands pointing to remarks and intricate arrows drawn in color. Disney was soon fired from his job and continued toward California. Several of his drafts are still on file in the Buncombe County Court House.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
8270
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Badin Elementary School in Stanly County has a new teaching aid. Painted by Susan Rice, a large mural fills the school's library. The mural includes lifelike nature scenes from around Stanly County and includes a variety of animals and plants. Measuring seventy-one fee high by nine feet long, the mural took over 600 hours to paint. Rice planned the project with school Principal Elvin Fisher. The mural created a lot of excitement as over 300 people came to the unveiling.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p8-10, por
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Record #:
8277
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For an old-fashioned scare, visit the Old Southport Cemetery. The oldest gravesite is dated 1804, but people were buried here earlier than that. The site today is overgrown with moss-covered oak trees and weeds. The Brunswick Inn and its ghost, Antonio Casaletta, offer another scary outing. Antonio was an Italian musician who, when staying at the Brunswick Inn as a member of inn's orchestra, ventured to sea and never returned. Guests have supposedly heard Tony walking through the music parlor, looking for his harp, since his death in 1882.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p20-22, por
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Record #:
8276
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North Carolina State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture began a cheese production program for western North Carolina in 1914. Farms in this region earned little income, and the program hoped to offer an opportunity for mountain farmers to earn more. Local men were trained by the program's agent in cheese factory operations. Factories were then built in Watauga County at Cove Creek and in Ashe County at Grassy Creek. Incomes did rise - farmers who participated in cooperative earned $1200 more in 1915 than they had the previous year. In 1916, cheese production created a $30,000 economic boost in these two counties.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p19, por
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Record #:
8278
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Montfort Stokes once gave up an opportunity to fill a vacant U.S. Senate seat in 1805, citing family obligations. Stokes was later elected to the senate seat in 1816, and he held that position till 1823. Stokes was a Virginia native but lived in Salisbury and Wilkes County. Stokes assisted in the settlement of the North Carolina – South Carolina and the North Carolina – Tennessee boundaries while serving as boundary commissioner. Stokes remained active in state politics as a member of the state senate, the state house of commons, and as North Carolina governor from 1830-1832. Stokes died in 1842 while serving President Andrew Jackson in the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p23-24, il
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Record #:
8274
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Lynn Banks Holt was a Confederate officer, a champion horse breeder, and a cotton mill owner. Holt, who was born in Alamance County, joined the Confederate Army on July 3, 1861. Taken prisoner twice, Holt was released from Union captivity on February 3, 1865. He kept a pocket diary throughout his captivity that included details on home remedies and poetry. Holt built the Oneida Cotton Mills in Graham following the war. With his financial success Holt began breeding champion trotting stallions, including the famous John R. Gentry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p16-17, por
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Record #:
8279
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\"American Cameo\" pottery was a highly prized art pottery produced by Asheville native Walter B. Stephen at his Pisgah Forest Pottery. The cameo style of pottery uses raised paintings applied with a sharp brush and then glazed. Stephen's work was well known throughout the United States before his death in 1961. The art form is not being lost, as other pottery artists are producing cameo work. Marjorie Pittman and Judy Petrie produce \"Carolina Cameo\" in their Catawba County studios, while Rodney Leftwich produces cameo pottery at his Asheville workshop.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p24-25, por
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Record #:
8275
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Jerry Bledsoe writes state interest columns for the GREENSBORO NEWS AND RECORD and the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER. Recently, he published CAROLINA CURIOSITIES. This book serves as a guide to almost all of North Carolina's festivals, tourist attractions, and curiosities. Included is information on such things as the Spivey Corner Hollering Contest, the Ayden Collard Festival, and Belhaven's flea marriage.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p18, por
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