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8 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984
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Record #:
8090
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While reading through the memoirs of her father, Betty Lou Bruton discovered recollections about her uncle E. L. Anderson. Anderson, known as “Uncle Ed” was well known in the Winston-Salem area for his abilities with horses. Local citizens during the 1920s and 1930s could usually see Anderson driving a coach through town, or in snow, a sleigh. The author grew up being told that Uncle Ed had driven the famous “Hattie Butner” stagecoach that was the last coach to run between Salem and High Point. Even with intense research, Bruton has been unable to verify that her uncle ever drove the famous buggy. She did find proof, however, that in 1932 her uncle played the role of George Washington's coach driver in a parade commemoration Washington's 1791 visit to Salem. Governor Max Gardner participated in the parade as well, playing the role of North Carolina governor Alexander Martin.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p20-22, por
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Record #:
8087
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Recent renovations of the Grove Park Inn in Asheville have once again made it one of the grandest resorts in America. The original structure, built in 1913, became a major retreat for America's elite. A two-million-dollar renovation and a twenty-million-dollar addition of 202 rooms have been completed. While Thomas Wolfe may no longer stroll through its grand hallways, the Grove Park Inn is once again a place of distinction for North Carolina, capturing the charm of the Appalachian area.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p15-16, por
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Record #:
8085
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Richard Kingston grew up admiring the sound of the harpsichord. He turned his interest into a business of building these musical instruments. With business going well in Dallas, Texas, Kingston decided to move to North Carolina. He located his harpsichord shop to the small mountain town of Marshall, North Carolina. The master craftsman has continued to find success with his harpsichord firm and has gained a good reputation throughout the United States
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p20-11, por
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Record #:
8089
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A major irritation in picking blackberries is dealing with trombicula, more commonly known as chiggers. If you want to pick berries in the wild, you will have to suffer through chigger bites. There are some homemade remedies however, that can help to prevent bites, including wearing tight clothing and placing a kerosene soaked cloth around your ankles.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
8088
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In April of 1862 the Confederate government found itself short of metallic materials. As a result, the government appealed to churches to donate their bells. Officials calculated that one church bell could be used to construct up to three cannons. Churches in Hillsboro, Washington, Edenton, and Charlotte all contributed their church bells for the Confederate cause.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p17, por
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Record #:
8086
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In the 18th-century, William Byrd an aristocratic Virginnian, became the scorn of North Carolina when he wrote the Tar Heel state was \"vile and repugnant\" when he was assigned a commission to draw the official North Carolina-Virginia state line. Virginians defended Byrd's remarks, and the dispute lasted into the 20th-century, with Governor Hunt demanding an apology from the state of Virginia.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
8084
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The electric sign over the Cannon Mills plant, built in 1930, was a local landmark in Kannapolis. Facing both U.S. 29 and the Southern Railway, the sign welcomed visiting travelers. Just as the textile industry disappeared from North Carolina, so too has this sign as it was recently taken down.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p1, por
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Record #:
8145
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Former Senator Sam J. Ervin Jr., argues that old age is no reason to stop living life. Using quotations from Marcus Tullius Cicero, Ervin questions the common assumptions about old age and writes on how old age must not be equated with ill health. Ervin's article was the introduction to Nancy Rica Schiff's 1983 book, 'A Celebration of the 80s.'
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 2, July 1984, p3, por
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