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5 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984
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Record #:
8353
Abstract:
In 1884, Mrs. Emily C. Prudden, a deaf, middle-aged, and former New England housemother visited the Francis Garretts in Gastonia concerning establishment of a girls' school. Mrs. Prudden continued to travel across western North Carolina establishing one or more schools in various towns. She prearranged benefactors for each school, as well as procured individual and organizational contributions. In 1888, she established Lincoln Academy at All Healing Springs, the first of seven schools she founded for blacks. She never asked for payment or recognition for her efforts, and none of the fifteen schools she built in her thirty-year career bore her name.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p10, 11, 23, por
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Record #:
8364
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Abstract:
Mrs. Katherine Sweet Babington was born in 1815 in Chatham County. She grew up around the Masonry traditions and in her late teens began spying on initiations in the Masonic Hall for an entire year until she was caught. Since she had learned all the order's signs, symbols, words and secrets, the prominent Masons decided to administer to her the three degrees of Masonry and she became a Master Mason. Although, in 1712 one other woman in Ireland had become a Mason, Mrs. Babington was the first woman Master Mason in the history of the Masonic order. She died in Shelby, NC in 1886.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p14
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Record #:
9571
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Abstract:
The town of Edenton is guarded by several cannons which were shipped there in July 1778. The citizens, however, had not expected their arrival, and they did not have the funds to pay for them. Later, it was discovered that American agents in France had arranged the order and never notified Edenton's citizens. Fearing that Lord Cornwallis might seize them on his way to Virginia in 1781, townspeople dumped the cannons into the river. In 1785, the cannons were raised and are again stationed around the town. They were never fired in defense of the town.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p15-17, il
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Record #:
9560
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Abstract:
Henderson revisits Mountain Island Lake, which is ten miles west of Charlotte. As a child, he was hired by Duke Power to clear brush around the lake to prevent mosquito breeding. Parts of the lake have changed. The old Highway 16 Bridge is gone. Revolutionary War general William Lee Davidson's nearby plantation has been restored. However, the Mountain Island hydro-electric plant still stands.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p8-10, il
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Record #:
9569
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Abstract:
Since 1789, only twenty-three members of the U.S. House of Representatives have been censured. Of these, only one, John Thomas Deweese, represented North Carolina. Deweese resigned his seat in February 1870, after he admitted accepting $500 for appointing North Carolinian Frank Bean to the U.S. Naval Academy. The former Congressman died July 4, 1906.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 10, Mar 1984, p13, 26
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