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4 results for The State Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937
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Record #:
15339
Author(s):
Abstract:
Aunt Sarah Grudger was arguably the oldest living American in 1937. The Asheville resident claimed she was born September 15, 1816. No official records existed to prove her date of birth because she was an ex-slave and very little was documented about slave births and deaths. Corroborating evidence included her memory of the 1833 meteor shower and other aged relatives who remember Aunt Sarah as an old woman when they were kids.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937, p3, il
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Record #:
15340
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prohibition extended unfairly to members of the Cherokee nation in the 1930s. Cultural biases and stereotypes about Native American inability to handle alcohol perpetuated strict prohibition enforcement on western North Carolina's Native American reservations. Under section 2139 of the Revised Statutes of the United States established in 1832, supplying Native Americans with liquor came with a two year prison sentence and $300 fine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937, p9, il
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Record #:
17026
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 19th- and early 20th-century, fire-balls were a prominent part in celebrating Christmas. Pressly describes how they are made and used during this holiday period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937, p11
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Record #:
17025
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hicklin describes how different Christmas celebrations were in the antebellum days from what they are today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 29, Dec 1937, p5, 18, 20, il
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