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5 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981
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Record #:
8668
Author(s):
Abstract:
The eleventh president of the United States, James K. Polk, was born in Pineville in 1795. Polk's father, Samuel, believed in free religious thought and did not prescribe to organized religion. At the insistence of his wife, however, Samuel took Polk to be baptized. Because Samuel refused to affirm his religious faith during the ceremony, Reverend James Wallis refused to baptize the baby. Polk never joined a church and was not baptized until 1849 by a friend who was a Methodist minister.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p9-11, il
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Record #:
8669
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1979, a talented high school senior football player from Idaho by the name of Harry “the Horse” Horseman, was recruited by six professional teams and more than 550 colleges. A. J. Carr, a sportswriter for THE NEWS AND OBSERVER, always had inside information on Harry because Carr had invented Harry. Guilford College's head football coach Charles Forbes announced Harry had signed with his team, a move that brought national recognition to Guilford. Even though Carr and Forbes both admitted he was a fictional character, many people continued to say that Harry was real.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p13, 33, il
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Record #:
8671
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Abstract:
Greensboro's First Presbyterian Church has long had a close relationship with Temple Emmanuel, a nearby Jewish synagogue. Temple Emmanuel was finished in 1924 and First Presbyterian was completed in 1928. One of First Presbyterian's stained-glass windows has a Star of David at its center. Both church buildings were designed and built by architect Hobart Upjohn of New York. Researchers have not been able to find any reference to the star in Upjohn's records, however, so its presence remains a mystery.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p17, il
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Record #:
8672
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July 1916, after two tropical storms ripped into North Carolina's mountains within days of each other, the Catawba River in Gaston County flooded. Bridges were washed out, mills were flooded, and several buildings were taken downstream. The Southern Railway trestle collapsed on July 16th,and the nineteen men who had been standing on it died. In total, eighty people died and flood damage topped out at $22 million.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p19-20, il
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Record #:
8670
Abstract:
Cherokee Indians in Asheville still practice the time-honored tradition of basket weaving. A skill that takes years to hone, basket weaving is not for the impatient. It takes hours to prepare the wood splints for weaving, to say nothing of the dyeing process. The designs are all in the heads of the Indians who make the baskets. Several skilled weavers teach classes at Haywood Technical Institute.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Aug 1981, p14-16, il
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