NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8642
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1815, Governor William Miller appealed to the North Carolina General Assembly to commission a statue and two portraits of President George Washington, for the State House rotunda, House room, and Senate room, respectively. The assembly appropriated $10,000 for a statue of Washington by Antonio Canova of Rome, Italy. Thomas Sully was chosen as the painter and, in 1817, completed a full-length copy of Gilbert Stuart's famous portrait of Washington. This portrait was placed in the State House and suffered fire damage when the House burned in 1831, and the restoration of the portrait was not begun until 1980. Dr. Adele De Cruz of the North Carolina Museum of Art, together with three other conservators and four assistants, has fully restored the painting, which will return to the State Capitol after being on display for a time at the museum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p8-10, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
8647
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1874, a white Massachusetts family landed at Hatteras and brought with them a young black boy named Thomas Vince, who was to be their servant and handyman. Nelson Paul Angell, his wife, Inez, their son, Lewis, together with Tom, lived in and manned the Hatteras lighthouse until Nelson died in 1887. Inez and the two boys then moved to the Angells' fifteen-acre retirement estate. Inez died in 1912, and, as sole beneficiary, Tom inherited the estate. Tom became the town's first tax-paying black resident and would remain so until his death. Tom made ice cream and played the parlor piano, which made his home a social center for the town. He was the chief cook for the Gooseville Gun Club, and, after he developed cancer, it was the club who paid all his medical expenses, property taxes, and funeral expenses. Tom died in 1937.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p19-21, 35, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
8646
Author(s):
Abstract:
“The Bard of Ottary,” Shepherd M. Dugger, wrote several books about courting in Watauga County in colonial days. Although the author insisted his stories were true, there is no doubt they were embellished. In one story, for example, a girl chooses whom to marry based on how many rattlesnakes each suitor has killed; in another, a girl's mother tells her suitor to kiss her daughter and then to kiss the boils on her back. Dugger was portraying the backwoods humor of the period. In his book, WAR TRAILS OF THE BLUE RIDGE, Dugger describes courting as one of his greatest pleasures.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p17-18, 38, il, por, f
Full Text:
Record #:
8644
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1754, Englishman Arthur Dobbs arrived in America to take over as governor of North Carolina in the midst of the French and Indian War. To protect the state, Dobbs had Fort Dobbs built near present-day Statesville and made Hugh Waddell commander of it. On the night of February 23, 1760, the Cherokee Indians orchestrated an attack on the fort, but the defenders fought fiercely and the Indians backed down. By 1766, Fort Dobbs lay in ruins. In 1970, the fort was recorded on the National Register of Historic Places and restoration of it began. Today, the fully restored fort sits on a thirty-three-acre plot of land complete with a visitors center and playground.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p12-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
8648
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Denton International Airport Annual Fly-In and Threshers' Reunion has been held in Davidson County on the Fourth of July for the last twelve years. Last year, over 500 antique engines were shown at the airport; the nearby moonshine still is operational but sampling is not allowed; and old-fashioned hoop cheese is made and sold to visitors. The newest attraction is the Handy Dandy Railroad, log railway terminal dating back to 1860. This year, over 20,000 visitors are expected at the fly-in.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p27-28, il
Full Text:
Record #:
8643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty to fifty years ago, croquet games were played in historic Durant's Neck in Perquimans County. Most players were from the area and played Saturday and Sunday afternoons to crowded lawns of spectators. Expert audience members conferred with players, using an extensive vocabulary of croquet jargon was used. Young people could play for fun only during mornings and early afternoons, to allow for the adults' late afternoon contests.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p10-11, 38, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Mining Museum in Little Switzerland preserves the old ways of mining feldspar. Work that was once done by men, women, and children in Mitchell and Yancey counties is now almost completely mechanized. Mitchell County remains the major U.S. source for feldspar.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 1, June 1981, p14-15, il
Full Text: