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8 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981
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Record #:
8834
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Abstract:
County-by-county listing of good news from 1980 includes awards won and new buildings or renovations begun or completed. The Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts opened in Waynesville last year and Bertie County organized a Crime Watch Program.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p8-9, 25-28, 34-56, il, por
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Record #:
8835
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Abstract:
Working on her turntable, Betty Kendall of Haywood County makes small lifelike animals out of clay. Her husband, Jim, makes jars and bowls on which Betty mounts her animals. Currently, the Kendall's work can be purchased at fifteen sales outlets in five states.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p12-13, il
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Record #:
8840
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cherokee legend says animals created human disease when they grew tired of men hunting them. The medicine man observed the effects of plants on animals when diagnosing treatment for sick tribesmen. In 1971, the Food and Drug Administration concluded a study on 2,000 Cherokee medicines and found 39% to be effective.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p20-21, il
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Record #:
8839
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Abstract:
Wilbur Tyndall, president of the Pink Hill Supply Company, has been in the business of selling John Deere tractors for twenty-six years. In his large collection of farm equipment, Tyndall has a replica of the first steel two-horse plow that Deere forged in 1837. He keeps his museum in a renovated garage and it is open to the public.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p18-19, il
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Record #:
8838
Abstract:
Merchants Thomas Stephens Memory and Thomas George Simms met on a train in 1850. Through they years, they developed a friendship. Memory named his son Simms Memory and Simms named his daughter Memory Simms. The two children grew up, fell in love, married, and moved to Whiteville where they lived happily for fifty years. Portraits of the couple are in the home of Emily Memory Peal at Chadbourn.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p17-18, il
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Record #:
8841
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Abstract:
Pole Hollow, a small valley between Pinnacle and Pilot Mountain, played host to Richard J. Reynolds, Jr. and his mother in 1910. Only five-years-old at the time, Reynolds was part of the famous Reynolds tobacco manufacturing family, and his mother asked everyone to call him “Dick.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
8837
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Abstract:
North Carolina folklore plays heavily on New Year's Day. For instance, if the first bird you see flying is flying low, you will be sick most of the year. It is bad luck to throw out dirty water or to wash clothes on New Year's Day.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p16, 58
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Record #:
8836
Abstract:
The author's personal account of traveling state-to-state on the railroad in the 1930s. The author's father was a railroad president and could therefore get free train tickets for himself and his family.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p14-16, il
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