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8 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980
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Record #:
8842
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Abstract:
In 1877, Governor Zeb Vance began his third term, deeply concerned about the state of the North Carolina State Library. He enlisted the help of Cornelia Phillips Spencer from Chapel Hill to re-catalogue the entire collection. Once the catalogue was complete, the collection had to be reorganized by State Librarian Sherwood Haywood. Spencer's catalogue, if published, did not survive.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p10-12, 32, il, por
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Record #:
8844
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Abstract:
Olney Presbyterian Church of Gastonia has a graveyard with one particularly interesting grave. The tombstone of William Barnes, who died in 1823, is inscribed with the phrase “aged 218 years.” Although there is no acceptable explanation for why the marker reads this way, members of the church today do not think Barnes lived to be 218.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p17-18, il
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Record #:
8843
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The First Baptist Church in Durham hosts a yearly Christmas choir recital. The choir is composed of fifth and sixth graders, the junior high school chorus, and the high school chorus. The high school chorus is directed by the head of the music department at Central High, William Powell Twaddell, nicknamed The Professor. The program lasts for an hour and a half.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p14-16, il
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Record #:
8847
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Fayetteville's Maurice Fleishman was the Baltimore Orioles' batboy when Babe Ruth made his first professional home run in Fayetteville in 1914. That year, team owner Jack Dunn had put together a team of former Major Leaguers, including Ruth, to come to Fayetteville for spring training. Fleishman's father and a friend, Jim Johnson, paid all the bills for the team.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p25, 38, il
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Record #:
8848
Abstract:
Cricket's Nest in Winston-Salem is a small non-profit store. It sells the senior citizens' crafts in Winston-Salem and surrounding Forsyth County, providing them with needed income. Sponsored by the public recreation department, the shop opened in November, 1976, and currently has a membership of 662.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p26-27, il
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Record #:
8845
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Abstract:
Born in 1760, George Gist preferred his Cherokee name, Sequoyah. Borrowing English letters, Sequoyah created an eighty-six sound syllabary of the Cherokee language. He presented his syllabary to the Cherokee council in 1819, and the council moved to establish schools. After a time, Sequoyah moved west and migrated to Mexico, after which his whereabouts were not known.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p21-22, il
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Record #:
8849
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Abstract:
Hatcher Hughes of Cleveland County won the Pulitzer Prize for “Hell-Bent for Heaven” in 1924. Material for the play was gathered near Boone and based on a 19th-century feud. Hughes graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1907, and obtained his master's degree from Columbia University in 1909. Hughes died in 1945.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p28-29, il, por
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Record #:
8846
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William Marcus Cathey was born on Conley Creek in 1871. A true frontiersman, Cathey killed his first bear at the age of twelve. Cathey took care of his mother until her death and never married. His mountain tales were recorded by Dr. Joseph Hall of Columbia University in 1938. Cathey died in 1944.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p23-24, 35, il
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