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6 results for The State Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981
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Record #:
8822
Author(s):
Abstract:
n 1830, there were fifty-six active gold mines in North Carolina, and the state was called the Golden State. Christopher Bechtler, Sr., moved to Rutherford County in 1830, and, in 1831, opened a currency mint. Bechtler died in 1842, but his mint continued stamping coins until the late 1850s. Many residents of Rutherford and surrounding counties have coins passed down through their families.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p8-11, il, por
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Record #:
8826
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twelve miles south of Mount Pisgah on the Blueridge Parkway, Graveyard Fields is home to some of the finest scenery in the country. On Labor Day, the opening of blueberry season is celebrated here, and dedicated pickers are known to camp out for days at a time. Although wild blueberries grow all over the state, Graveyard Fields draws a crowd because of its breathtaking views.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p20-21, 67, il
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Record #:
8824
Abstract:
Hotel Robert E. Lee was built shortly after World War I and hosted many of Raleigh's elite during World War II. A famous portrait of Robert E. Lee that hung in the hotel lobby was rescued by the United Daughters of the Confederacy before the building was razed in 1971. Today, Hyatt House has both the site and the painting.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p13, 67, il
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Record #:
8823
Author(s):
Abstract:
Delilah Baird was born in Watauga County in 1807. Baird eloped with John Holtsclaw in 1825, whose lawful wife was Fanny Calloway. Despite this, Holtsclaw left 480 acres of his land to Baird when he died. Baird died at the age of 83 and is buried in Valle Crucis.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p11-12, il
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Record #:
8827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of the pound net, originally used by Croatan Indians and depicted in John White's drawings, can still be seen in North Carolina rivers of today. The pound nets of today are more sophisticated, but still lead fish into a trap and hold them there. A full size net is on display at the North Carolina Marine Resources Center on Roanoke Island.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p22-23, il
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Record #:
9039
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1850s, wealthy women of Wilmington wore fire beetles on their clothes for formal evening occasions. Emitting a beautiful greenish light at the base and reddish light at the abdomen, fire beetles were sold at about twenty-five cents a dozen. The beetles required food, twice daily baths, and were kept in tiny cages. The bugs are native to tropical North and South America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p19
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