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5 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979
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Record #:
9064
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Part I of a two-part article, Grant describes five weeks she spent with her uncle and a fishing crew on Topsail Island in 1934. She was seven years old. The crew was made up of thirty-five back-country watermen and farmers, who stayed on the Island from August to November. The crew fished for mullets, and each man cleaned and packed his own shares of the catch. Shares were divided into a sort of monetary system dependent upon a creman's rank, and what supplies he provided to the expedition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979, p8-11, il
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Record #:
9068
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the U.S. Coast Guard cutter NORTHWIND came to Wilmington's waterfront last December, it docked in the same spot on the Cape Fear River that the cutter DILLIGENCE had in 1792. The icebreaker was relocated from Baltimore in 1978. Visitors are welcome about the 269-foot icebreaker on weekends from one to four before the ship returns to ocean duty in August.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979, p25-26, il
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Record #:
9066
Author(s):
Abstract:
What started as only one or two wagon trains a year is now a weekly event. The Piedmont Wagon Train Association of Randleman keeps a schedule of when and where the wagon trains will be. Each train starts Friday with a square dance and there is always a parade with prizes. Between forty and fifty wagons participate each weekend beginning in late March and extending through November.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979, p20-22, il
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Record #:
9065
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro established the Parkway Playhouse in Burnsville thirty-one years ago. Since then, 159 plays have been performed there. The season lasts for seven weeks during which time the actors live at Parkway and work intensely, honing their craft and forging lifelong friendships.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979, p12-15, il
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Record #:
9067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pokeweed was one of the vegetables discovered by the early settlers and is still eaten throughout the south. Although the plant and its berries are poisonous, a familiar handler can pick young shoots and boil them to eliminate the poison. Resembling spinach once cooked, poke provides a great source of vitamins A and C.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 12, May 1979, p23-24, il
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