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6 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976
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Record #:
9186
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Abstract:
Despite pleas from American colonies for England to fund the building of roads, substantial roads were not built in America until after the Revolutionary War. In the 1770s, a horse-drawn wagon that could travel between New York and Philadelphia in a day and a half seemed so incredible it was dubbed “The Flying Machine.” Travel time between colonies was now greatly reduced. The first turnpike was built in Virginia in 1785, after which time inns and taverns began to spring up, and the first scheduled travel appeared in America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p24-26, il
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Record #:
9185
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Abstract:
This article is a re-print of an article found in the STATE's March, 1947 edition. Michael lived in a log cabin in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina during the Civil War. She made clay piped used by both Confederate and Federalist soldiers. Michael sold her pipes at 25 cents a dozen. She died at the age of 75, just seven years after Robert E. Lee's surrender.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p21-22, il
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Record #:
9182
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Duke University Chapel's Dirk Andries Flentrop organ, built over the course of six years in Zaandam, Holland, will be used for the first time during Christmas services this year. The 18th century organ is made of 5,000 pipes which were dismantled in Holland and reassembled in the Chapel. This is one of the largest Flentrops in the world, second only to one in Rotterdam.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p10-12, il
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Record #:
9184
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Abstract:
Peggy Hoffmann was approached by ex-con Frank Watson to help him write his autobiography. One on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List, Watson is now a counselor who works with young offenders to steer them off the course he chose to follow. The book, BEEN THERE AND BACK, is available through John F. Blair Publisher of Winston-Salem.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p17-18, por
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Record #:
9187
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Abstract:
Carroll Stinson of Graham decorates his home each year for Christmas. Only in 1973 during the energy crunch, did Stinson not decorate fully. This year, he plans to have around 3,000 lights. Stinson also solely sponsors a Miss Christmas pageant each year, and, while admission to the event is free, a donation box is set up for patrons to contribute to expenses.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p31-32, il
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Record #:
9183
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the 1720s, rice was becoming a staple crop in North Carolina. In 1860, the rice yield from the Lower Cape Fear region reached eight million pounds. Swamp land had to be cleared to plant rice and slaves were used to cultivate and harvest the crop. Although rice continued to be grown after the Civil War, rice-growing in North Carolina came to a cessation in the 1890s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 7, Dec 1976, p14-16, 39, il
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