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8 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976
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Record #:
9133
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Abstract:
During the Colonial Period, North Carolina accounted for three fifths of all naval stores shipped from the American colonies to England. Naval stores include tar, rosin, turpentine, and pitch. In 1705, England, no longer dependent on Sweden and the Baltic countries for stores, passed the Naval Stores Bounty Act, authorizing large payments for the goods from the colonies. Although the turpentine industry boomed in the 1840s and 50s, the Civil War was devastating to the industry which never fully recovered after the war.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p14-16, il
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Record #:
9131
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The State Art Society was founded fifty years ago, and run by Kat Pendleton Arrington of Warrenton for twenty-nine years. The first gallery of the Art Society was opened on February 26, 1929, just a year after Arrington's death. Although the society's long line of executives has made a point to continually contribute to the Museum of Art, its budget is completely separate.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p9-12, il, por
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Record #:
9134
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John Allen and his family left the Hawfields community in 1852, and moved to Arkansas. By the time they arrived, letters from home were waiting for them. The letters between Allen and his family at home in Alamance County give a detailed description of what occurred in Hawfields in the decade leading up to the Civil War. Fountain records some of the events here, including slave ownership, the copper boom, and deadly diseases.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p17-18, por
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Record #:
9132
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Joann Denton of Morganton is a self-proclaimed witch. When she accurately predicted the death of Dorothy Ramsey, Ramsey's daughter brought charges against Denton. Denton, cleared of all charges and now with nationwide notoriety, predicted the death at a séance. Denton never charges for her séances or readings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p13, 30, por
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Record #:
9138
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Connie B. Gay of Wake County was born on a 17-acre farm. By the 1950s, Gay owned fourteen radio stations. The first to operate a country music station in a large metropolitan area, Gay's gross fortune was estimated by THE WASHINGTON POST to be $50 million. Gay sold his businesses and retired to homes in Florida and Virginia in 1972.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p26-28, il, por
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Record #:
9137
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Gus's Original Forty Niner restaurant in Charlotte contains historic Victorian furniture. Owned and operated by the Kokenes family, the restaurant has pieces from estate auctions and building demolitions. Lighting fixtures, counter tops, and doors all come from old buildings in the Charlotte area, ranging from bars to churches. A brochure, free at the front desk, fully documents all of the pieces in the restaurant.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p22-24, il
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Record #:
9136
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This article is a reprint of “Uncle Billy's Fire Burn On,” originally printed in THE STATE, Vol. 12, No. 13, August, 1944. The article discusses Billy Morris and the fire kept burning in his Saluda cabin for over 150 years. Begun in 1790 by his great-grandfather, Uncle Billy's fire got national recognition in 1937 when he was taken to New York and put on a national radio program.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p20-21, il
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Record #:
9135
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Nona Lockhart began stitching monograms as a hobby ten years ago. Since then, she has enjoyed a profitable business making hundreds of flags for boats, marinas, and clubs all across the country. Each flag is handmade and designed by Lockhart. She can be contacted in Morehead City.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p18-19, il, por
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