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3 results for The State Vol. 40 Issue 12, Dec 1972
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Record #:
9934
Author(s):
Abstract:
Settled in 1730 by Ebenezer Harker, by 1900 Harkers Island had become home for approximately 20 families whose main income derived from fishing and whaling. Harkers Island fishermen most often built their own boats without the use of drawn plans, relying instead on distinctive, “high flared bow” hull designs that had been passed down from previous generations. Boatbuilding on Harkers Island remains much the same today, with six or more major boat works on the island building every size of boat, from eight-foot dinks to eighty-foot luxury yachts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 12, Dec 1972, p12-14, il, por
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Record #:
9937
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Joel Lane home is the oldest house in Raleigh. It was built in 1760 and has been owned by the Colonial Dames since 1927. It is now in the process of restoration for the first time in 200 years at a total cost of $98,000, one fourth of which was covered by two appropriations from the N.C. Legislature. Lane is called Raleigh's founding father because he sold 1,000 acres of land to the State for the building of North Carolina's first permanent capital in 1792. Additionally, the Lane house served as the location for the North Carolina General Assembly's meeting in 1781.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 12, Dec 1972, p23, il
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Record #:
9935
Abstract:
Davidson College, founded in 1837 by Southern Presbyterians, is home to two historic buildings from the antebellum period. The buildings were erected by the Eumenean and Philanthropic literary societies in 1849 and 1850, respectively, and were primarily used for debates. After society membership declined in the early 20th century, the buildings fell into disrepair but were saved from the wrecking ball in the 1950s by a donation from alumna Mrs. Clarence Hodson (formerly Lille Brown) that covered all costs of restoration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 12, Dec 1972, p18-20, il
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