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4 results for The State Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970
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Record #:
10612
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Abstract:
The most successful Confederate spy, in terms of turning in the most important and vital military information, was probably Washington socialite Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Wealthy, educated, and widowed, Mrs. Greenhow used her luxurious home as the center of Confederate espionage activities, apparently making little or no effort to hide her support of the South. Arousing the suspicion of Federal authorities, Mrs. Greenhow was shadowed by Allen Pinkerton and arrested by Union forces for espionage. Despite being sentenced to house arrest, Mrs. Greenhow continued her work for the Confederate cause, including a secret mission to Europe in 1862. Greenhow drowned on the return voyage in 1864 when her ship ran aground near Fort Fisher.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p11, 28, il, por
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Record #:
10615
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Abstract:
Since its incorporation in 1888, the town of Southport's residents had hoped for rail service to aid in the establishment of their town as a coaling station and shipping terminal at the mouth of the Cape Fear River. In 1905, a charter that eventually failed was granted to the South Atlantic Terminal Company. By 1911, a new company, the Wilmington, Brunswick, and Southport Railroad had begun daily rail service between Wilmington and Southport, including a spur line with a trestle extension that allowed coal burning steamers to fill their bunkers with coal directly from the railroad cars. During World War I, soldiers returning on leave dubbed the W.B.&S. the \"Willing But Slow\" due to its slow progress in returning them to their homes in Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p19-20, il
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Record #:
10613
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to Joseph Robert's THE STORY OF TOBACCO IN AMERICA, methods for curing the golden leaf have changed through the years, but a barn of some type has been central to the process from the very beginning. Log-constructed tobacco curing barns were widely used in North Carolina from the 1600s well into the 20th century, even as curing methods changed from wood fires to oil and gas furnaces in the 1940s and 1950s. By the 1960s, new barn construction was modeled after modern stick-built homes, including electric furnaces for curing, and the old log barns, dilapidated from neglect, began to slowly disappear.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p12-13, il
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Record #:
10614
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oak Ridge Institute, which was built in 1852, closed in 1862 because the entire student body volunteered for service in the Confederacy. On the eve of its reopening in 1866, fire destroyed the school's main building. The following morning, undaunted educators and students made the determination to carry on in a log building with no desks until reconstruction could start. Thus was born 'The Spirit of 66', giving name to a credo which has sparked the development of Oak Ridge Institute for the past 120 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p17-18, il
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