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3 results for The State Vol. 37 Issue 7, Sept 1969
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Record #:
10688
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the early 1800s, summer resorts had become very popular in the South, especially those with natural springs considered to be curative. One of the most famous North Carolina springs was the Rockingham Mineral Springs, later known as Lenox Castle. Visitors came from as far away as Georgia and Alabama, and cabins were built near the spring to accommodate visitors. Around 1800, John Lenox, an eccentric land speculator and promoter, purchased the springs and began advertising it in Raleigh newspapers as Lenox Castle or The Castle of Thundertonstrench.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Sept 1969, p12-13, 24, il
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Record #:
10689
Author(s):
Abstract:
On an arrowhead hunting expedition, Tom Morgan of Hoffman found instead a graveyard of prehistoric dinosaur fossils. After three weeks of excavation near Pekin, in Montgomery County, geologists unearthed a load of 185 million year old bones, including a four-foot two inch jawbone. The bones were identified as those of a phytosaur from the Upper Triassic Age. Geologists Russ Patterson and Bob Gannis contacted the American Museum of Natural History in New York, which sent officials to evaluate the site. Full scale excavations began on June 4, 1969.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Sept 1969, p15-16, il
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Record #:
10683
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph Wallace King of Winston-Salem painted the first commissioned portrait of Richard Milhous Nixon after he became President of the United States. The portrait now hangs in the Law School at Duke University.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 7, Sept 1969, p10-11, 24, por
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