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3 results for The State Vol. 36 Issue 23, May 1969
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Record #:
10821
Author(s):
Abstract:
The battle flag of the Randolph Hornets Company M, 22nd North Carolina Militia has come home again to Randolph County, from whence it departed over one hundred years ago. The flag was presented to the Randolph Historical Society by Dr. and Mrs. Marion B. Roberts, of Hillsborough, and was placed on permanent display in Asheboro. It is known that the flag left Randolph County when the company was mustered into service in 1861, and that it traveled with the Hornets, who fought in every major battle of the Civil War except First Bull run, throughout the war until the surrender at Appomattox, Virginia. Its location thereafter remained a mystery for over one hundred years until it reappeared in the hands of a Civil War collector in Connecticut in the 1960s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 23, May 1969, p12, 31, il
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Record #:
10823
Author(s):
Abstract:
The King's Mountain Railroad was chartered at Chester Courthouse, now Chester S.C., on December 19, 1848. By 1852, ten miles of track had been constructed, carrying tourists to Yorkville, now York, S.C. After a hiatus brought on by the Civil War, construction began anew in 1872, with ambitious plans to put rail service deep into the wilds of North Carolina, at which point a new corporation, The Chester & Lenoir Narrow Gauge Railroad, was formed. After the C & L went into receivership in 1893, a new operating corporation, known as the Carolina & Northwestern Railway Company, was formed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 23, May 1969, p16-18, 26, il
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Record #:
10822
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Thomas F. Covington was hanged by the Catawba County sheriff in 1896, execution was still a county matter, although his death sentence could have been commuted by the Governor or the State Supreme Court. Sheriff T. L. Bandy imposed the death sentence on Covington for the murder of store owner James Brown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 23, May 1969, p13-14, il
Full Text: