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4 results for The State Vol. 30 Issue 19, Feb 1963
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Record #:
12774
Author(s):
Abstract:
Set to be built on the east side of Winston-Salem's Courthouse Square, the largest and tallest commercial office building South of Baltimore and East of Dallas, is underway. Commissioned by the Northwest Corporation and constructed by Dwight L. Phillips, the new building is planned to occupy 650,000 square feet, extend 410 feet into the skyline, and cost up wards of $15 million dollars. Wachovia Bank and Trust Company along with a multiplicity of other ventures will occupy the 34 floors allotted in the new building.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 19, Feb 1963, p25-29, il
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Record #:
12773
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chosen for the flowers, weather, and charm existing throughout the city, Tryon, North Carolina was deemed one of the four prettiest towns in the United States by New York Times column writer, Don Culross Peattie. Inspiring a similar article, specifically related to equally awe arousing towns in North Carolina, Old Trudge mentions Southern Pines, Blowing Rock, Chapel Hill, Beaufort, and Belhaven as equal contenders in the prettiest towns debate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 19, Feb 1963, p20-22, il
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Record #:
12772
Abstract:
Wilmington native, Charlie Hopkins, learned the trade of metal working during his time spent in the Merchant Marines during WWII. Upon returning to the United States, Hopkins began crafting his own designs, gaining notoriety and popularity with each new piece. Renowned worldwide for his inventive methods in jewelry making, Hopkins opened a store in Chapel Hill, and continues to experiment with new ideas in the jewelry profession.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 19, Feb 1963, p11, 18, il
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Record #:
12771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Discussing unprecedented cold weather in North Carolina, this article addresses the winters of 1857 and 1893, both of which produced complete river freezes within the state, an uncommon occurrence for this region of the country.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 19, Feb 1963, p8-9, 39, il
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